Windows Wolfram Tones?

has anybody here got wolfram tones to work on win 7?

quicktime seems to be outdated and I guess most newer browsers don't support the midi playback
also half the website doesn't seem to work
 

Yal

šŸ§ *penguin noises*
GMC Elder
You don't really get that good output either IMO... I dabbled a bit in procedurally generated music a year or so ago, but if you make enough tracks they start audibly sounding samey. I'd actually recommend learning a bit of composing first so you know how to fix things that doesn't sound good. This forum post is pretty useful, I learned how to music using these tutorials. Recommending Tchaikovsky's book in particular: https://www.google.se/url?sa=t&rct=...CF-My0VmpIeVrV7AQ&sig2=c-aDb7NfI3cXo6jqjyrogw
 

Misty

Member
You don't really get that good output either IMO... I dabbled a bit in procedurally generated music a year or so ago, but if you make enough tracks they start audibly sounding samey. I'd actually recommend learning a bit of composing first so you know how to fix things that doesn't sound good. This forum post is pretty useful, I learned how to music using these tutorials. Recommending Tchaikovsky's book in particular: https://www.google.se/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiU0vni_czNAhUEXCwKHcGPC80QFggdMAA&url=http://www.64digits.com/users/index.php?userid=StevenOBrien&cmd=comments&id=501037&usg=AFQjCNHK1vEmZxXjQCF-My0VmpIeVrV7AQ&sig2=c-aDb7NfI3cXo6jqjyrogw
That guy is silly. You don't need to have the skill level of Bach or Mozart to make successful video game music. It's an option on the table though. You just need emotional and kinaesthetic awareness, it's more important than technical theory in my opinion.

It's the difference between THIS and THIS.
Both are masterpieces and suitable for games, only one has the skill level of classical music though.

Yal, I couldn't find your music anywhere, may I hear a sample please, I am curious to hear some of it.
 
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S

Snail Man

Guest
I get Yal's point: You don't need to be a great composer, but with a bit of music theory, you can really improve your music, be it original, or even just fixing up generated music. I also agree that you need a good understanding of mood, and the emotions that your music evokes. However, the combination of both is the best of all.
 
N

nvrogers

Guest
You don't need to dedicate your life to composing, but I would strongly recommend that you pick up an instrument and learn some theory. Knowing about scales, intervals, and basic major and minor chords lets you do a surprising amount of composing. Plus, from there it's not too hard to just use your ears to make more complex arrangements. You won't be making any masterpieces (probably), but you'll probably be able to make a fairly competent soundtrack.
 

FrostyCat

Member
That guy is silly. You don't need to have the skill level of Bach or Mozart to make successful video game music. It's an option on the table though. You just need emotional and kinaesthetic awareness, it's more important than technical theory in my opinion.
Do you understand the difference between recommending a book written by an expert musician to others, and recommending others to be on even footing with an expert musician?
 

Misty

Member
Geisha Girl, there is no need to be rude.

Perhaps you read the post Yal linked to, perhaps you did not.

The latter smells to be the case.
If so, I shall say this.

The dude was going on about needing to be blindfolded and playing Bach's sonata by ear at dusk, as well as playing the aria's on a midi keyboard at blazing speeds, as a rite of passage in order to get into the game music industry.
He said if you cannot do this, you will be unable to dazzle the audience, no matter the adagio, 99.9 percent of composers will utterly fail and should just give up, and then he went onto say that Mozart and Bach's skill level wasn't even genius, just basic necessity, basic barebones, and that anyone with a successful game music career needs the same amount of skill or more skill than Mozart and Bach.
 

BLang

Member
The dude was going on about needing to be blindfolded and playing Bach's sonata by ear at dusk, as well as playing the aria's on a midi keyboard at blazing speeds, as a rite of passage in order to get into the game music industry.
...and that anyone with a successful game music career needs the same amount of skill or more skill than Mozart and Bach.
Never was video game music composition ever mentioned in that blog post. He was talking about being an actual composer, you know, just for the sake of making music. Not a second rate composer, mind you, he's talking about being an actual, acclaimed composer. And to do that, you really do have to do all those things. You have to be on par with Mozart and Bach.

Now, when it comes to composing music for video games, it's a bit easier than that.

But either way, all of that is completely besides the point, seeing as Yal was actually just recommending the book Guide to the Practical Study of Harmony by Tchaikovsky, which was linked to in that blog post.

ANYWAY, BACK ON TOPIC

I think procedurally generated music, if anything, can only detract from the experience of your game - after all, it wasn't really written for your game, it was just... written. It's the same as using randomly generated sprites for your game. Sure, the sprites may be nice, you may even have hand picked the ones that fit the best, but the disconnect is still there. How close are those sprites to your original vision? You can ask the same about music.

In most cases, visuals and audio are the only senses that the player perceives the game through (unless you have haptic feedback... or *shudders* a scratch and sniff disk). Leaving one of those up to a bunch of dice rolls is almost always a bad idea, and if there's a way around it, you should probably consider that.

As to why Wolfram Tones doesn't work for you... I have no idea. It doesn't work for me either. :/
 

Misty

Member
seeing as Yal was actually just recommending the book
False.

She did not say only the book was useful, she said the forum post was useful too.
Yal said:
This forum post is pretty useful


Never was video game music composition ever mentioned in that blog post. He was talking about being an actual composer, you know, just for the sake of making music.
False. It was a blog posted on 64 digits and he says
"So, you want to do music for a living? My advice to you is this; Don't. Unless you can't live without music, unless you feel that there's absolutely nothing else in the world you'd rather do, unless you need several hours of your favorite composer/artist every day simply to live, just don't bother. If you can be happy just pursuing this as a hobby, content yourself with that and find another line of work."
That is all encompassing terminology, it includes videogame music as well.



Also, this topic is getting off track, I wanted to hear Yal's music and I have not heard it yet.
 
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