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What are some gamefeel tips and tricks?

Zerb Games

Member
Hey guys, been watching a lot of stuff on YouTube about this for the past year or so. I've watched a lot of Vlambeer talks, Markbrown, and other stuff as well as read a ton of stuff. Been really getting into this with my game, so I was wondering what tips/tricks you guys have for making your game feel great, and for making things that matter stand out. Thanks!
 

RangerX

Member
"Game feel". This is broad and there's no science about it. I think its a combination of elements and if you find your "right receipe" you will end up with a game that feels good.
Psychologically speaking though, most "good feel" comes from a proper response for a interaction. And when you there's enough interaction with a proper and satisfying response, you create a good feeling for the player.
 

woodsmoke

Member
Well you sure lose alot of your time when you make a bad game. And time is everyone's most valuable asset. I think Rami says this too. I guess you do gain experience though.
 

Wayfarer

Member
@Lonewolff: That's a really awesome video!

@Zerb Games: On game feel, regarding 2D platformers at least...

Matt Thorson recommends some of the following things (creator of Jumper series, Towerfall etc):
  • If the player is about to land and presses jump slightly early, say by a few pixels, you could have the game "store" that jump so when they do touch the ground they jump.
  • Similarly, if a player is running to prepare for a big jump and they accidentally press jump too late (and they technically have started to fall), you could still allow them to jump slightly after going off the edge.
(reference: http://ask.fm/MattThorson/answers/135884996398)

I *think* he also said (but I may be wrong on this and it may've been someone else) that another thing you can do is decrease the gravity while the player is holding jump down. So if the player is attempting a really large jump this turns out to be quite handy.

Zack Bell has a good article here, too:
https://zackbellgames.com/2014/10/27/how-to-make-a-platformer-feel-good/

Here are some things I think are generally important:
  • There should always be clear feedback between the controls and game.
  • If it's a game that involves enemies: larger enemies usually "feel" better. Something about aiming for small enemies is often less appealing (can feel tedious).
  • Giving enemies lower health often feels more rewarding, especially early on in the game.
  • When enemies are destroyed, having a rewarding destruction animation, having particles and suitable sounds all add to "game feel". Same goes for collecting items.
 
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SnoutUp

Member
The only advice from the "Level UP" book I remember is that you should put a lot of effort in making the core mechanic(s) as enjoyable as possible and to test that - strip out everything else. If your game is about jumping, is jumping around still fun in an empty room? Is shooting at a wall feels good enough? Helps me a lot with simple games.

And, of course, that contains all the things mentioned in this thread or gamedev talks/articles.
 

ShaunJS

Just Another Dev
GMC Elder
When I watched that video, I thought, it isn't possible to fail if you have nothing to lose in the first place. Absolutely impossible.
I don't think many people with access to the tech required to use these forums and develop video games have "nothing to lose". Though sometimes you can be free/privileged enough to risk not much more than "moving back in with parents" etc I suppose. Those are good places to be in if you want to take the risks of going indie but they are still risks and the odds are stacked enormously against you.

Honestly, I like inspirational stuff as much as the next dude and I know this thread is about game feel stuff rather than this but legit think this is the most important and valuable talk Rami has ever done.
 

Genetix

Member
Best thing you can do is make a 100 games. A 100 of those games will likely suck and not be fun, but your next 100 games will suck less and be ever so slightly less boring, and so on. Pessimistic?
 

Zerb Games

Member
I happen to come across this video and it got me curious. It's basically someone giving a speech with a game demo where it is gradually updated to make the game feel good.
Seen it.
@Lonewolff: That's a really awesome video!

@Zerb Games: On game feel, regarding 2D platformers at least...

Matt Thorson recommends some of the following things (creator of Jumper series, Towerfall etc):
- If the player is about to land and presses jump slightly early, say by a few pixels, you could have the game "store" that jump so when they do touch the ground they jump.
- Similarly, if a player is running to prepare for a big jump and they accidentally press jump too late (and they technically have started to fall), you could still allow them to jump slightly after going off the edge.
(reference: http://ask.fm/MattThorson/answers/135884996398)

I *think* he also said (but I may be wrong on this and it may've been someone else) that another thing you can do is decrease the gravity while the player is holding jump down. So if the player is attempting a really large jump this turns out to be quite handy.

Zack Bell has a good article here, too:
https://zackbellgames.com/2014/10/27/how-to-make-a-platformer-feel-good/

Here are some things I think are generally important:
- There should always be clear feedback between the controls and game.
- If it's a game that involves enemies: larger enemies usually "feel" better. Something about aiming for small enemies is often less appealing (can feel tedious).
- Giving enemies lower health often feels more rewarding, especially early on in the game.
- When enemies are destroyed, having a rewarding destruction animation, having particles and suitable sounds all add to "game feel". Same goes for collecting items.
Read them, but I still like your little bullet points, you make a very valid point. Considering I have these in my game, and didn't really even think about them, just kinda did them 'cause it felt right.

If you listen to Vlambeer, you will fail. He has given speeches as to why 'you will fail'. Haha!


When I watched that video, I thought, it isn't possible to fail if you have nothing to lose in the first place. Absolutely impossible.
Seen it, great talk! :)

"Game feel". This is broad and there's no science about it. I think its a combination of elements and if you find your "right receipe" you will end up with a game that feels good.
Psychologically speaking though, most "good feel" comes from a proper response for a interaction. And when you there's enough interaction with a proper and satisfying response, you create a good feeling for the player.
I am aware. Game feel is the response back after input is given to the game essentially. While no it is not technically tactile, there is a feel aspect to it because of the controls.
 

ShaunJS

Just Another Dev
GMC Elder
God no! Don't make me move back in with my parents! :p

On the serious side though, the tech is freely available if you are struggling financially. Even you guys generously give a free version. And the people who frequent these forums, the majority would still be living at home, as the demographic is quite young.

These people are in the absolute ideal situation.

Even with myself having a full time job, Wife, and two kids to support, I can easily make massive progress each day on games (provided I'm not feeling lazy :D).
Good computers, food and rent to support you developing video games isn't that freely available :p.
But yeah, that's kind of the point of the talk. You have to be able to fail because you almost certainly will. If like I say, you've worked out your rock-bottom-scenario and it doesn't leave you on the streets and your ok with the high odds of landing there no matter how hard you work or strive to learn? Or you're able to keep your day job and work part time on your thing without much real risk? Then go for it.

But know the risks and know the odds and take them seriously. Don't give up everything on a lottery ticket. Hard work is necessary and vital but unfortunately does not come anywhere close to guaranteeing success.

Anyway, that's enough of me hijacking. I think Zack Bell is about to put out an article on game feel for platformers that might be worth a looksie.
 

NazGhuL

NazTaiL
Create games with passion is the key. Concept and code. Then if you suck for the rest of the job, hire a professional : sfx, art, marketing. It's cheaper to do it yourself, but if you do it, do it right.
 

Wayfarer

Member
Just remembered some more:
  • Player projectiles often feel better if they're quite fast. Conversely, enemy projectiles feel better at a slower speed where you get sufficient time to avoid them (I *believe* @Yal may have mentioned this in another thread a while back).
  • In situations where the player has very limited time to avoid something, say a close range attack, having a clear enemy "wind up" animation is pretty much essential.
  • Wide open areas with specific "challenge spots" often feel nicer than cramped areas (you don't want to be always bumping your head everytime you jump). Having said that, there may be times where you actually want things to feel cramped.

I mean these things are all kind of obvious. But they're still worth having at the back of your mind. Also, sure, there are games that don't adhere to these concepts, yet are *still* undeniably awesome. But these work as a good starting point.

ShaunJS said:
Honestly, I like inspirational stuff as much as the next dude and I know this thread is about game feel stuff rather than this but legit think this is the most important and valuable talk Rami has ever done.
I'm really glad I watched that.

ShaunJS said:
I think Zack Bell is about to put out an article on game feel for platformers that might be worth a looksie.
Yeah, I've been waiting for this!
 
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ajan-ko

Member
control response (no delay on the input)
jump buffer (when the character want to jump after he land to the ground, or jumping after attacking),
hitstop (you stop the animation when you hitconfirm your enemy).
dash cancel (when you attacking, the dashing canceled the animation, but some player may abuse it into slash-dash-cancel aka SDC),

watch how broken SDC is

Overall, it's easier to program shooting rather slashing.
Slashing need those things called start frame, active frame, and recovery frame. Also you need to program jump buffer.
 
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