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Undertale Full version, a 2001 Sony...and now a 2002 Dell (So This Is Different!)

GusCE6

Member
Hello again.

Some of you may remember a while back I posted about trying to get the full (GameMaker Studio) version of "Undertale" running on a 2001 Sony laptop, so far still with no success. It runs the Demo (GameMaker 8) version just fine.

Before moderators consider this to be a redundant post there is a new factor involved: a 2002 Dell.

The Sony's specifications: 2001, Model PCX-SR77, Windows XP Home Edition, Service Pack 3 installed, Pentium 3 800MHz processor, Intel Integrated chip (last available driver update mid-2002), 1024(h) x 768(v) resolution at either 16 or 24-Bit color (both tried), 256MB RAM (that's the maximum), ancient security software (I browse in Puppy Linux mode, it is a Dual Operating System device).

Under sad and peculiar circumstances I also own a 2002 Dell laptop. Its specifications: used by an honest amateur who usually was not online (so updates questionable at best) with it, Windows XP Home Edition, Service Pack 2 installed, 1024(h) x 768(v) resolution at 32-Bit color, 256MB RAM, Pentium 4 1.6GHz processor, GeForce2 Mobile graphics chip (thus different drivers as well), ancient security software.

"Undertale" full version does run on the Dell. The graphics were badly fouled up, but once I dropped the SwiftShader 2.1 files into the game folder the game runs nicely enough. This is also true with "Undertale: Yellow" and "Underfell Demo."

So obviously the problem is not the RAM involved. It is not the Operating System, nor the Service Packs. It's not the resolution. There are a number of games that run on it that do not run on the Sony: "Sprill Undersea Adventure," "Mystery of Mortlake Mansion" (albeit poorly due to insufficient power), "Card City Nights," "Brave Furries," "Panda Chunky," "Mahjong Astral Dimensions 2," and although unplayable "Breezeblox" and "Puzzle Puppers" do at least fire up. Some games do require SwiftShader 2.1 as well.


This does narrow the problem down. Unless it involves the hardware- the graphics chip specifically, there has never been a message about SSE2 instructions- then something is missing. What does GMS demand that GM8 does not? Whatever that difference is, assuming Toby Fox did not alter the game engine, is the problem.


Note that the Linux version does work on the 2012 ASUS in Puppy Linux 6.0.5 Tahrpup mode, but not in either Sony nor Dell in Puppy Linux 5.2.5 Lucid mode. Using WINE with both Sony and Dell does not get the Windows version running. Note that 5.2.5 Lucid is the highest version those two antiques can handle. Also note that in all three ways the ASUS runs the game (Linux, WINE Windows version in Linux, and the Windows version in Windows 8 mode).
 

FrostyCat

Member
I don't see DirectX anywhere in your problem description, and that could be what you're missing.
The Manual for GMS 1.4 said:
GameMaker: Studio requires a reasonably modern PC running Windows XP, Vista, 7, or later. A DirectX 9 (or later) compatible graphics card with at least 32MB of memory is required for most created games. It requires a screen resolution of at least 1024x768 and 65536 (16-bit) colours (but preferably 32-bit true colour). Also a DirectX 9 compatible sound card, or integrated sound chip, is required. It is always recommended that you make sure you have the most recent drivers installed for your system.

GameMaker: Studio requires DirectX version 9.0 or later to be installed on your computer. (You can download this version of DirectX from the Microsoft website at: http://www.microsoft.com.) When designing and testing games, the memory requirements can be pretty high (at least 128 MB and preferably more, but this depends on the operating system). When just running games, the memory requirements are less severe and depend a lot on the type of game as well as the resources being used.

NOTE: Although most modern PCs ship with DirectX 10 and higher, this does not mean that DirectX 9 is present on your machine, and you should still install it from the link given above!

Please note that Steam users also have an additional target for compiling games which is the Steam Workshop. While creating and testing your game, this target module will work exactly the same as the standard Windows module, however when creating your final executable you will be shown additional options to submit the game directly to Steam. More information can be found here.
The Manual for 8.1 said:
To be more precise, GameMaker requires a resonably modern PC running Windows 2000, XP, Vista, 7, or later. A DirectX 8 (or later) compatible graphics card with at least 32MB of memory is required for most created games. It requires a screen resolution of at least 800x600 and 65000 (16-bit) colors (preferably full color). Also a DirectX 8 compatible sound card is required. Make sure you have the most recent drivers installed. GameMaker requires DirectX version 8.0 or later to be installed on your computer. (You can download the newest version of DirectX from the Microsoft website at: http://www.microsoft.com/windows/directx/.) When designing and testing games, the memory requirements are pretty high (at least 128 MB and preferably more, also depending on the operating system). When just running games, the memory requirements are less severe and depend a lot on the type of game.
In any case, GMS 1.4 is built for machines 5-10 years downstream compared to when 8.1 was current, so I think your attempt to treat them as contemporaries is misguided to start with. There's a good reason why your previous topic went nowhere, and you don't seem to have gotten the point.
 

GusCE6

Member
According to DXDIAG DirectX 9 is installed in both cases, sorry about that. But that in of itself means nothing.

SwiftShader is a "software based rendering solution" to rendering problems a computer could be having. For example, when trying to run "Sid Meier's Pirates! 2K" on the Sony you always get a message about DirectX 9 not being installed in spite of what DXDIAG says. BUT- if you use either SwiftShader 2.1+ or 3D-Analyze (which would boost the DirectX level up a notch; e.g. 8.1 to 9) it then works. There are a number of games that will not run on the Sony without SwiftShader or 3D-Analyze, and some that will not on the Dell. SCUMMVM will not work on the Sony without SwiftShader 2.1 or 3D-Analyze.

There is a version of SCUMMVM available- a sort of 2.2- that does run Gingertip's "Foxtail." On either Sony or Dell in Puppy Linux 5.2.5 Lucid mode (Dual Operating System devices) that version of SCUMMVM allows one to play the game, but only if SwiftShader 2.1 is in the SCUMMVM folder. A number of other games, such as "Deepica," will not run with WINE unless SwiftShader is present.

As I said before- the game DOES RUN on that ancient Dell (2001 vs. 2002 = 1 year difference); as long as SwiftShader 2.1 is in the game folder the rendering troubles it has are 100% solved. A 2002 Dell laptop is also ancient hardware, so obviously age is not a factor here. That Dell is not a gaming rig, just a laptop.

The problem here is that yes, the graphics are a massive mess on the Dell when you try to run the game without SwiftShader- but, and here is the point in this case, the game does at least run! In the Sony's case it never even gets that far- nothing happens except for that "C000001D" error message. There is no error message about DirectX in any case. If the game did fire up on the Sony it would likely have the same problem as the Dell, but SwiftShader would fix that completely- it just never gets that far.

So it's NOT the Operating System, it's NOT the DirectX, it's NOT the Service Packs or lack thereof, it's NOT the resolution, it's NOT the RAM involved, and it is obviously not the age of the device (or is 2002 that much better than 2001?). Something else is involved here, and I'm more and more convinced that whatever it is is also preventing those other games from running, the ones that do run on the Dell.
 
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