Trying to build a new PC

EvanSki

Raccoon Jam Host
I know this is Kezarus post (no, it's not, split from here ~Tsuk) but seeing as the computer wizards are here
Edit: Thanks @TsukaYuriko


Can someone with a bigger brain then a raccoon tell me if these parts work together, and if they are cost efficient


Edit: totally forgot about a graphics card and the one I would need/want alone is worth the same of all these parts combined
 
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TsukaYuriko

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These should be physically and logically compatible.

As for whether they are cost-efficient, we'd have to know what you intend to use this PC for. List anything you wouldn't trust your grandma to do on her PC on a Sunday morning (as in, anything other than basic home / office usage).
 
For (almost) all your compatibility checking needs.

Why do you need 64GB of RAM? Unless you're doing something highly-memory-intensive like running a Minecraft server with a zillion mods and 100+ players, editing long high-def videos, or editing raw high-res photos in PS, there's little need for that much RAM. "It's future proofing" isn't really a good excuse either, since by the time 64GB will be the bare minimum recommended spec, DDR4 RAM will have been long a thing of the past. It's not difficult to upgrade RAM later on either, if you find your original spec lacking.
 

EvanSki

Raccoon Jam Host
Why do you need 64GB of RAM?
You know, I was probably just caught up in the moment lmao

As for whether they are cost-efficient, we'd have to know what you intend to use this PC for.
Knowing I should have certain machines built for certain tasks aside
Having 1 machine with power to do all my tasks is more cost effective then having a poor-man's apple store

I plan to use the PC for the following
  • Gaming
  • Video editing
  • Streaming/recording
  • Game Maker
 

kburkhart84

Firehammer Games
I'm personally just glad I'm not in need of a new PC right, what with the next gen CPUs and DDR5 RAM coming up soon enough. I'd hate to build one right now with that knowledge.
 

TsukaYuriko

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I have to agree that right now is probably the worst time to buy a PC, not only because of new releases being around the corner, but also the general inflation of PC hardware due to a combination involving Corona, cryptocurrency mining and probably also the secret Russian tuna toast society. Take that as a word of caution if what you have right now is still doing its job somewhat properly. Though, if the goal is to buy a PC no matter what, who am I to stop you? :)

I plan to use the PC for the following
  • Gaming
What kinds of games are you intending to play? New releases? Mostly older games? What kinds of genres do you usually play? All these play a vital role in determining which components are most important, and thus where you could save some of your budget (if that is desired).

  • Video editing
What kinds of video footage are we talking about here? For example, what resolution and frame rate are you usually working with? That'll give us a rough estimate of the required data and processing bandwidth.

  • Streaming/recording
As in both on the same PC? I generally only recommend this when either the source being recorded is not very resource-intensive in the first place, or failing that, if the PC being used for it has hardware that's already on the "overboard" side. Playing games requires performance, recording games requires performance, so both at the same time will require the combined performance. You can easily ruin your gaming or streaming performance (or both) by also streaming from the same PC if the hardware is not up to the task.
 
You know, I was probably just caught up in the moment lmao


Knowing I should have certain machines built for certain tasks aside
Having 1 machine with power to do all my tasks is more cost effective then having a poor-man's apple store

I plan to use the PC for the following
  • Gaming
  • Video editing
  • Streaming/recording
  • Game Maker
Yeah, with those use cases, you definitely won't be able to take full advantage of the 64GB of RAM*. Heck, you might not even be able to fully utilize 32GB of RAM. I've done some moderate video editing (trimming 60m of 1080p30 footage to ~15m for YouTube and adding some effects), and by far the biggest bottlenecks were the CPU (for rendering) and the storage (for scrubbing through the video). I didn't even come close to maxing out my 16GB of RAM. I'd highly recommend dropping your RAM and putting some of that into the CPU or even upgrading to an NVMe SSD for smoother video editing.

*unless you're doing something crazy like editing 8k video
 

EvanSki

Raccoon Jam Host
What kinds of games are you intending to play?
New releases and VR

What kinds of video footage are we talking about here?
At the moment only 60fps 1080p videos

As in both on the same PC?
Yeah I get that also, The way Im seeing tho, with the parts I might as well buy a new case and a SSD and make it, its own computer and the one Im using now be the recorder, So I guess we can take Video editing and recording off the list and focus on a decent gaming rig

Edit: this is what im looking at rn any suggestion for a price drop for any part is welcomed already had to get a bare bones case :(
 
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All that money, and you settle on a cheap cooler :p. The Hyper 212 is still a great value after all these years, but you'll need something more adequate for the 10850K, especially if you plan on taking advantage of the K. I'd go for an NH-D15 or a decent AIO.

I took a look at a QVL list for the motherboard, and I didn't see that specific set of RAM on there. The 32GB set was listed, but not under QVL. Take note of that when you shop for RAM.
 

TsukaYuriko

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Edit: this is what im looking at rn any suggestion for a price drop for any part is welcomed already had to get a bare bones case :(
Which GPU do you currently use? My first suggestion would be to drop the GPU and use the one in your current PC. Of all the hardware components, GPU prices are incredibly inflated as of writing, and you'll have a hard time to find an offer that doesn't charge outrageous prices. The price listed on the list is about twice the MSRP, for example.

If you do decide to buy a new GPU, I highly recommend to do your research, look up its MSRP and price history across a wide range of resellers. If you find one that sells anywhere close to the MSRP, and the GPU upgrade lets you do something you'd really rather not miss out on, go for it. Otherwise, if budget is an issue, buying a GPU easily the fastest way to blow it.


On the subject of re-using parts, please let us know your current PC's hardware. This will give us a rough idea of what kind of upgrade would actually feel like an upgrade to you, and who knows, maybe some of these parts could even be re-used to save some of your budget?


New releases and VR
At the moment only 60fps 1080p videos
Yeah I get that also, The way Im seeing tho, with the parts I might as well buy a new case and a SSD and make it, its own computer and the one Im using now be the recorder, So I guess we can take Video editing and recording off the list and focus on a decent gaming rig
Sounds like the two most important parts here would be the CPU and GPU. Unfortunately, those are also the two that are most inflated right now, so you'll have a hard time getting them for a fair price.


CPU:

If a lack of warranty and the possibility of ending up with hardware that gets sold due to low binning results is not a concern, you may be able to pick up reasonably priced used ones, as whenever there's a batch of new CPUs and GPUs being released (currently Radeon RX 6000 series and, to a lesser extent, Ryzen 5000, and probably soon Core 11000 series), there's going to be a bunch of people that feel like they need the absolute newest and greatest and thus will sell their old hardware (and probably a kidney) to be able to afford the upgrade.

Speaking of binning: Are you planning to overclock? Asking because components that can be overclocked (or have been tested to run stable when overclocked to a certain point) are more expensive than those that can't or weren't tested (or failed such tests), but don't necessarily perform better than any other specimen when not overclocked. So if you don't plan to overclock, getting stuff that's made for overclocking is a waste of money.

For the CPU, the 9900K is made for overclocking and extreme applications. Depending on which games you play, you may not need all of the performance this CPU has to offer. Compared to something like a 10600, for example, you're looking at half the retail price with more or less comparable performance. Examples of games you'd like to play would help to get a clearer picture of whether you'll be able to make full use of this CPU, or if it wouldn't be better to put some of that money into something else.


In general, I'd currently also recommend going with AMD for CPUs - that is, if you can find one - as they tend to do better not only in terms of the price to performance ratio but also performance and price altogether compared to Intel CPUs.

Storage:

I heavily recommend getting an SSD, and that's not just for video editing. You may want to consider an NVMe SSD for even greater speed than a conventional SATA SSD that is limited to 600 MB/s by the interface, especially because the price difference between the two is slowly but surely diminishing as NVMe is taking over the market shares. It would also be beneficial for you in case you ever decide to go beyond 1080p or 60 FPS, as the quadratic explosion of data from upping the resolution, potentially even combined with higher frame rates, tends to blow SATA bandwidth out the window, and the last thing you'd want is for videos to not only buffer on Youtube, but also when reading from local storage!

The exact price to storage ratio depends a bit on the exact manufacturing process, as there's more to an "NVMe SSD" than just that (for example how the data is stored on the drive, keywords for this are the difference between SLC, MLC, TLC and QLC drives, if you want to inform yourself). If you decide to go for an SSD, we can help you pick one that suits your needs and your budget, so I'll leave details out of this post for now.


RAM:

Regarding 32 GB: While it has been mentioned that you may not be able to "fully" utilize 32 GB of it, that's generally a good thing. You don't ever want to be "fully" using your RAM, as that means you're writing to the page file or, worse yet, crashing. Rather than asking yourself if you need 32 GB, ask yourself if you'll be able to fully utilize 16 GB (ideally, you currently have 16 and can just straight-up test this by firing up everything you could ever be using at the same time). If the answer to that is a no, go for 16.

My general rule of thumb here is that 4 is plenty for grandma (more or less the bare minimum for Windows 10), 8 is plenty for office usage, 16 is plenty for most games (and I mean only the operating system and the game here, not also having other stuff open in the background), and if you have any more than 32 or above, you probably have a legitimate need for it due to what you're doing (e.g. virtualization, art, content creation) and it becomes harder and harder to generally classify the exact need. The way I see it, this mostly depends on which games you're planning to play.

Whatever amount of RAM you decide to go with, keep in mind that you should always have sets of RAM sticks, never an odd amount, to take advantage of double data rate. Also keep in mind that the denominator will limit your direct upgrade options in the future, as you have four RAM slots available on the motherboard you picked, two (at least) of which you are going to fill. This means that going with 2 x 8 GB will make your maximum upgrade option 32 GB without throwing out the ones you're about to buy, while 2 x 16 GB makes the maximum 64 GB. This may or may not be an issue for you, depending on if you intend to keep upgrading individual parts of this system in the future, or just want to buy a fully new PC every few years.


Also, the usual question: Are you planning to overclock this? The sticks you picked are tested for an overclock of 3200 MHz, so unless you will actually overclock them to that, these will be no better than the considerably cheaper ones rated for the stock speed of 2400 MHz.


GPU:

Don't, unless you have to. Beware of scalpers. Ideally, wait until the inflation dies down and make do with what you have right now.

PSU:

1050 W seems a bit on the overkill side. (Not sure if this is a part you picked or a part the site suggests since there's an added note about "parametric selection"...) With the estimated wattage being 364 W (which seems a bit on the low side to me, I'd expect around 400), you may want to go for one with 800 W (to run it at half load for maximum efficiency).
 
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Also, the usual question: Are you planning to overclock this? The sticks you picked are tested for an overclock of 3200 MHz, so unless you will actually overclock them to that, these will be no better than the considerably cheaper ones rated for the stock speed of 2400 MHz.
Stock speed of current-gen processors is 2666MHz. Hasn't been 2400 since 7th gen Intel, I believe. I know because I'm stuck on 2400MHz >.>

To add to this, if you're scared of overclocking, when it comes to RAM, don't be. It's not a difficult process. Literally a single yes/no toggle in most BIOSes. It's not dangerous either, unless you're manually changing frequencies without knowing what you're doing. RAM sticks rated for [x]MHz RAM sticks are guaranteed to run at that speed. If your computer won't boot afterwards, that means your RAM is definitely faulty and you can almost always get an easy (free) replacement through an RMA.
 

EvanSki

Raccoon Jam Host
On the subject of re-using parts, please let us know your current PC's hardware.
Intel i5-6400 (Its out lived its usefulness to be honest)
Nvidia Geforce GT 1030 (Runs great for games made from xx-2017) anything newer then that and it starts to chug, it barely runs fallout 4 for example
8gb ram that google chrome alone eats it all
1TB HDD for windows
4TB for Games and the launchers and such (more then enough for now)

Currently I only see being able to use the power supply and the drives for a new computer.

I dont plan on overclocking as Overclocking means more heat, extra heat means need for better cooling, I dont want/have money to deal with,
So the CPU made for performance as is with no need to edit will do fine

16GB might be fine but I see 32gb as a good buffer if my pc suddenly decides windows needs to do stuff while im playing a vr game, or for just general quality of life
I do see that 32gb could be over kill so what I might do is go for 16 and see how that works out if needed get 32gb
I took a look at a QVL list for the motherboard, and I didn't see that specific set of RAM on there. The 32GB set was listed, but not under QVL. Take note of that when you shop for RAM.
As I am a small raccoon whos never touched a computer with the ability to run crysis, I have no idea what you mean by QVL

The price of gpu's right now is outrageous, this alone might cause me to hold off on getting anything just yet, I do think I need/want a new one RTX seems like a good choice for the beatifying capabilities of having one (raytracing, shaders, max settings, 60fps at least)


My current rig isnt power demanding and has a 500W PSU in it working fine, so to look at these new parts and think the power demand is under that is ludicrous, 500W may be fine but depends on the other parts for the build.

Examples of games you'd like to play
half-life alex
beat saber
the outer worlds
Herizon zero dawn
Detroit become human
Cyberpunk 2077, yes yes hush! as bad as it is, I want to give it a far shot, I already have the XB version of the game and it looks and plays terrible, might as well try it with the recommended platform capable of running the game as it was meant to be, plus I can tweak files on the pc
 
QVL is essentially a compatibility list. If you get RAM that has not been tested or has been found to be incompatible with your motherboard, you could run into issues like not being able to enable XMP to run your RAM at its advertised speed, or there could be stability issues and such. 16GB of a particular RAM might work just fine with a specific motherboard, but the 32 variant of the exact same RAM, speed and timings and all, could be using different chips that then won't be fine.
 

EvanSki

Raccoon Jam Host
Update
I've found out my motherboard is an
ASUS M32CD_A_F_K20CD_K31_CD

so now to save money I'll be upgrading that instead of getting a new one, but i still see the need for a new one with modern hardware, For now however this is the plan


I found a person selling a RTX 3070 and as far as I can tell my MB is compatible with it

im going for an Intel core I7-6700K as it seems to be the best for the price and whats compatible while offering performance

and getting 8gbx2 Ram sticks


Motherboard: ASUS M32CD_A_F_K20CD_K31_CD PRICE: already own
CPU: Intel core I7-6700K Price: $304
GPU: Nvidia RTX 3070 Price: $640 going to try and ask for $500
RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3000 C15 2x8GB Price: $85
 
I think settling for your current motherboard is going to be a real setback, and I'd recommend just getting a new one. First off, $300 just to switch to an i7 from the same generation? You could buy a 3600X for less. Second, I couldn't find any information on your motherboard, but considering how similar your current build is to my old one, I'm going to guess that your RAM is DDR3, which means any of the fancy RAM you're looking at will not even fit into the slots on your motherboard, let alone be compatible.

Also, are you still getting a new case? My 3070 is a twin-fan, and I still wouldn't be able to fit it into my old Acer tower without unsoldering the drive bays and keeping the side cover off. Make sure you have the space if you're not.
 

EvanSki

Raccoon Jam Host
I think settling for your current motherboard is going to be a real setback, and I'd recommend just getting a new one. First off, $300 just to switch to an i7 from the same generation? You could buy a 3600X for less. Second, I couldn't find any information on your motherboard, but considering how similar your current build is to my old one, I'm going to guess that your RAM is DDR3, which means any of the fancy RAM you're looking at will not even fit into the slots on your motherboard, let alone be compatible.

Also, are you still getting a new case? My 3070 is a twin-fan, and I still wouldn't be able to fit it into my old Acer tower without unsoldering the drive bays and keeping the side cover off. Make sure you have the space if you're not.
Im currently using a I5-6400 so any upgrade is better then nothing, idk about a 3600X
my ram is DDR4 and as far as im aware thats pretty good for modern upgrades as long as i stick to the same chipset
im keeping the same case, an asus m32cd

heres a manual for the motherboard and pc build
 
Update
I've found out my motherboard is an
ASUS M32CD_A_F_K20CD_K31_CD

so now to save money I'll be upgrading that instead of getting a new one, but i still see the need for a new one with modern hardware, For now however this is the plan


I found a person selling a RTX 3070 and as far as I can tell my MB is compatible with it

im going for an Intel core I7-6700K as it seems to be the best for the price and whats compatible while offering performance

and getting 8gbx2 Ram sticks


Motherboard: ASUS M32CD_A_F_K20CD_K31_CD PRICE: already own
CPU: Intel core I7-6700K Price: $304
GPU: Nvidia RTX 3070 Price: $640 going to try and ask for $500
RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3000 C15 2x8GB Price: $85
If my preliminary searches are correct, this is your PC.
1615945723840.png
As far as I can tell, your mobo is on the H81 chipset. Meaning, you can't overclock your RAM. You can't go any faster than 2133MHz, which was the base speed when 6th Gen Intel chips launched. Buying nice, high-speed RAM would be a waste. Important to note that slow RAM is going to neuter the speed of your CPU a lot more than you may realize, especially in newer or bigger titles. As someone currently using a 7700k (basically a 6700k with a new name [EDIT: and w/ 2400MHz RAM to boot]), it's not worth the upgrade at the 6700k's current prices. Even the generation immediately after the 7700k is a massive upgrade, and going for a Ryzen 3600 or 5600 is going to cost barely any more or even about the same as a 6700k, and you'd get a new chip vs a used one.
 
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TsukaYuriko

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This is not a motherboard manual, but a PC manual. It doesn't list any of the motherboard's technical specs, nor does it list what the motherboard is. Unfortunately, I can't find precise information about your motherboard. Are you sure that's the motherboard's model number and not the PC's? Not that I can find that one, either.

Based on searches for the motherboard you provided, I'm getting results of SODIMM RAM (260 pins) that is supposedly compatible with the mystery motherboard. This is not to be confused with DIMM RAM (288 pins). These are two different form factors, and they don't fit into each other's slots. The RAM you're intending to get is a DIMM, so if my results are fitting for the motherboard you have, this RAM in turn won't fit into your motherboard at all.

Im currently using a I5-6400 so any upgrade is better then nothing
While this statement is true, you do not get this upgrade for free.

Is it a coincidence that the 6700K is the exact CPU that's listed as one of Cyberpunk's minimum system requirements? If not, it being the minimum requirement neither means that it'll adequately run the game, nor that it's a good component (for the current time, compared to more modern options) in general.

Either way, the upgrade you've chosen is not much better than what you currently have, but still comes with a hefty price tag for someone who's trying to save money. You're not saving money by buying something that won't work much better than the old thing and will be put back on the "parts to upgrade" list right away. That's just a waste, and I highly recommend you not to go for it. Whatever gains you'll get from it is not worth $300.

Another thing to consider is that you're probably also going to bottleneck your shiny brand new GPU if you go with a CPU that can't match its performance (which is likely to be the case with a 5 year release date difference).

I'd say nothing (and a bonus $300) is better than this upgrade. You could invest that into an upgrade that gives you a reasonable gain in performance. I'd spend part of it on a new motherboard that opens up substantially more upgrade paths. AMD is currently dominating the market both in terms of price and raw performance, so unless you know you need an Intel CPU for something specific, I'd generally recommend going with AMD at the moment. You can probably get a new motherboard and CPU for $300 that will, on top of that, give you better performance than the upgrade you're currently aiming for.
 

EvanSki

Raccoon Jam Host
Are you sure that's the motherboard's model number and not the PC's?
Yes im very sure, i looked for and gave up trying to find a motherboard manual, but that is in deed the motherboard, but seeing everything I might as well get a new one but that feels like getting shot in the foot to enjoy ice cream

Ryzen 3600 or 5600
as far as I know and what pc builds have said neither of these will fit in the motherboard

Is it a coincidence that the 6700K is the exact CPU that's listed as one of Cyberpunk's minimum system requirements?
It was just coincidence

as for ram all I know is
This is the current ram I have that fits and works
 
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TsukaYuriko

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Yes im very sure, i looked for and gave up trying to find a motherboard manual, but that is in deed the motherboard
When you can't find any decent info about your motherboard, that's a clear sign that you should get a new motherboard. This is the heart of your system, and not knowing what it is (or what's on it) is equivalent to buying a pig in a poke when buying new hardware. Unless it's apparent by sheer coincidence based on what's already in your PC, you won't really be able to tell whether what you buy will or will not work until you put it in.

as for ram all I know is
This is the current ram I have that fits and works
... aaaand case in point.

as far as I know and what pc builds have said neither of these will fit in the motherboard
Hence the suggestion to get a new motherboard, as your current one harshly limits your upgrade choices and makes what even is a choice confusing at best and impossible to tell at worst.

Okay lets try a different approach

How's this look?
Overall, that's a much better fit. However, that's a somewhat comparable CPU to the one you initially planned to get in terms of heat output, and yet you still settle for the same cheap cooler... :D
If that's supposed to be a budget choice, you're saving money in the wrong place. Clients often call me overly grumpy about air flow and cooling in general, but it's not without reason. The best engine in the world is not going to make your car go faster if the engine is on fire. Overheating hardware is slow hardware, no matter the hardware's performance.

While the "CPU ON FIRE" thing is no longer the real threat kind of issue it was one or two dozen years ago, you're really not doing yourself any favors by going for a cheap cooler and then stuffing high-end components that output more heat than those singles in your area from those advertisements in the bottom right corner into your system. If you want to use high end components, I'd recommend going for a high end cooler like a Dark Rock Pro 3 or 4, an NH-D15, or something comparable to them.

Look at it this way. You have an Intel 10th gen CPU and an Nvidia 30 series GPU in the limited space of an ATX case. Hardware which, by all means, packs respectable and most likely adequate performance for whatever you're intending to use it with.
It would put a massive damper on your $1700 system's capabilities if your budget-friendly cooling turns out to be inadequate and, while your shiny new hardware is trying to blow out the fire to prevent the heat death of the universe, everything slows down to a crawl after a few minutes of intensive use.
You could potentially save a lot more money on those high-end components and settle for cheaper components that will, without overheating, perform comparably to your overheating high-end hardware... just because you saved $80 on adequate cooling. Not a position I'd like to be in.

This is of course all hypothetical, but the whole point is that if you're going to cut corners somewhere, don't cut corners with the cooling.


Also don't cut corners with the power supply, because it seems like you almost cut the wattage in half while upping the series of both of your CPU (albeit with a lower TDP) and GPU (with a higher TDP). Not a good combo. Running out of power won't just slow down stuff, but crash. Hard. I don't think you'll run into problems with a 600 W PSU unless you overclock stuff (not that you can overclock this particular CPU anyway), but I also don't expect you'll have a lot of headroom for upgrades.
 
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EvanSki

Raccoon Jam Host
When you can't find any decent info about your motherboard, that's a clear sign that you should get a new motherboard. This is the heart of your system, and not knowing what it is (or what's on it) is equivalent to buying a pig in a poke when buying new hardware. Unless it's apparent by sheer coincidence based on what's already in your PC, you won't really be able to tell whether what you buy will or will not work until you put it in.


... aaaand case in point.


Hence the suggestion to get a new motherboard, as your current one harshly limits your upgrade choices and makes what even is a choice confusing at best and impossible to tell at worst.


Overall, that's a much better fit. However, that's a somewhat comparable CPU to the one you initially planned to get in terms of heat output, and yet you still settle for the same cheap cooler... :D
If that's supposed to be a budget choice, you're saving money in the wrong place. Clients often call me overly grumpy about air flow and cooling in general, but it's not without reason. The best engine in the world is not going to make your car go faster if the engine is on fire. Overheating hardware is slow hardware, no matter the hardware's performance.

While the "CPU ON FIRE" thing is no longer the real threat kind of issue it was one or two dozen years ago, you're really not doing yourself any favors by going for a cheap cooler and then stuffing high-end components that output more heat than those singles in your area from those advertisements in the bottom right corner into your system. If you want to use high end components, I'd recommend going for a high end cooler like a Dark Rock Pro 3 or 4, an NH-D15, or something comparable to them.

Look at it this way. You have an Intel 10th gen CPU and an Nvidia 30 series GPU in the limited space of an ATX case. Hardware which, by all means, packs respectable and most likely adequate performance for whatever you're intending to use it with.
It would put a massive damper on your $1700 system's capabilities if your budget-friendly cooling turns out to be inadequate and, while your shiny new hardware is trying to blow out the fire to prevent the heat death of the universe, everything slows down to a crawl after a few minutes of intensive use.
You could potentially save a lot more money on those high-end components and settle for cheaper components that will, without overheating, perform comparably to your overheating high-end hardware... just because you saved $80 on adequate cooling. Not a position I'd like to be in.

This is of course all hypothetical, but the whole point is that if you're going to cut corners somewhere, don't cut corners with the cooling.


Also don't cut corners with the power supply, because it seems like you almost cut the wattage in half while upping the series of both of your CPU (albeit with a lower TDP) and GPU (with a higher TDP). Not a good combo. Running out of power won't just slow down stuff, but crash. Hard. I don't think you'll run into problems with a 600 W PSU unless you overclock stuff (not that you can overclock this particular CPU anyway), but I also don't expect you'll have a lot of headroom for upgrades.
Okay so I'll build a fire bomb later maybe but for now

Swapped the Cooler for be quiet! Pure Rock Slim 35.14 CFM CPU Cooler be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 3 67.8 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler

swapped the PSU for Rosewill 850 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply

updated parts list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/vNPknL
 
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TsukaYuriko

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Is the cooler swap supposed to be an upgrade, or just saving money? Because if it's supposed to be an upgrade, I'm not so sure whether the two differ much in terms of cooling capacity.
 

EvanSki

Raccoon Jam Host
Is the cooler swap supposed to be an upgrade, or just saving money? Because if it's supposed to be an upgrade, I'm not so sure whether the two differ much in terms of cooling capacity.
Ah no, I picked the wrong one,
I went for the one you suggested the
be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 3 67.8 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler

EDIT: Couldnt find the pro 3 anywhere but the part builder tells me the pro 4 will work
 

TsukaYuriko

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You'll have minimal headroom with the cooler (7 mm) but everything should physically fit (based on the information provided by the case manufacturer). This would be an upgrade which, unlike the previous iteration, you'll not only feel in your wallet, but also in terms of performance gain. You could probably save some money and get better performance by going with an AMD CPU and motherboard, but I don't see anything "obviously wrong" with the current build.
 
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