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Tips For Making Games

cdgamedev

Member
Was just wondering if anyone has any tips for people making their first proper games in GameMaker: Studio.

In my case I want to publish it on Steam. I already have an idea for a game but don't want to jump straight into it and it ending as a catastrophe :eek:. I could only think of one place to ask and that's here because I know that most people have either made a game or - unfortunately - failed to make a game... I'd prefer to know things to avoid and let development run smoothly than hit a brick wall after a month and be unable to recover.

Thanks (in advance),
Callum :D
 

csanyk

Member
Make a whole bunch of games before you publish commercially. Make sure you're not a beginner by the time you release your first game. Once you're taking money, it changes the whole thing. People will hate you for the stupidest reasons, and think that if they gave you a dollar that means you owe them everything they want.
 

Misu

The forum's immigrant
Game developent takes time and dedication. To make something well made or decent, its best to take your time working on it step by step, patiently. Never rush things. Always start off basic and simple, then little by little add new things to it and improvements. Id always would work on programing the engine first before working on any art and music. Gameplay seems to have more importance so art is something I worry for last (exceptional if you are hiring an artist or composer though). Its important to know if your mechanism works properly and it is enjoyable to play, although sprite collision might be an exception too. Game making takes lot of work so try to keep your pace steady and calm, that way your game will come out right and stable.
 
D

Dr Sunnyside

Guest
Start by making something completely different from your goal. Choose an old game, tetris pong or asteroids and make that. Get to know the engine and the best process of working for you. Learn to make everything organized.

Best of luck!
 

SnoutUp

Member
Start small, learn to do basic things and connect them together, check out gamejams (look for something with longer duration & relaxed rules at first) and try to make a game for them, use Twitter to connect with other game developers. Don't start with Steam, publish your games in itch.io and GameJolt first, see what people like and dislike (might be different outlook from how you see your games). Adapt, fix stuff, learn to polish your games and then, after all this, start your Steam-worthy project.

Or do whatever you want, I'm not a gamedev police :)

Was just wondering if anyone has any tips for people making their first proper games in GameMaker: Studio.

In my case I want to publish it on Steam. I already have an idea for a game but don't want to jump straight into it and it ending as a catastrophe :eek:. I could only think of one place to ask and that's here because I know that most people have either made a game or - unfortunately - failed to make a game... I'd prefer to know things to avoid and let development run smoothly than hit a brick wall after a month and be unable to recover.
 

cdgamedev

Member
Make a whole bunch of games before you publish commercially. Make sure you're not a beginner by the time you release your first game. Once you're taking money, it changes the whole thing. People will hate you for the stupidest reasons, and think that if they gave you a dollar that means you owe them everything they want.
Oh god... Sounds like a lot of fun xD... Thanks, glad I know what to prepare for now :D. Also, I've made a few games - but nothing on a large scale... i.e. Brick Breaker and Asteroids. Thanks csanyk!

Game developent takes time and dedication. To make something well made or decent, its best to take your time working on it step by step, patiently. Never rush things. Always start off basic and simple, then little by little add new things to it and improvements. Id always would work on programing the engine first before working on any art and music. Gameplay seems to have more importance so art is something I worry for last (exceptional if you are hiring an artist or composer though). Its important to know if your mechanism works properly and it is enjoyable to play, although sprite collision might be an exception too. Game making takes lot of work so try to keep your pace steady and calm, that way your game will come out right and stable.
I dread doing art and sound anyway so they'll probably happen last. Thanks Misu!

Start by making something completely different from your goal. Choose an old game, tetris pong or asteroids and make that. Get to know the engine and the best process of working for you. Learn to make everything organized.

Best of luck!
Hehe... I know how to use GameMaker - I've prepared (by spending 700+ hours on it on Steam alone). I know the language fairly decently. And yeah, something simple and 'easy' but something to complete. Thanks Doc!

Start small, learn to do basic things and connect them together, check out gamejams (look for something with longer duration & relaxed rules at first) and try to make a game for them, use Twitter to connect with other game developers. Don't start with Steam, publish your games in itch.io and GameJolt first, see what people like and dislike (might be different outlook from how you see your games). Adapt, fix stuff, learn to polish your games and then, after all this, start your Steam-worthy project.

Or do whatever you want, I'm not a gamedev police :)
Made me chuckle xD. I did the GMC game jam... Didn't come last which is a good thing haha. And I talk to 'a few' developers already who are a little older than me. They're always welcome to answering my questions. Thanks Pig Person :p!

Just make a rough prototype to get feedback. So your REAL game can be vastly improved.
Didn't think about making a prototype... I was just gonna get right into it (after seeing some advice other developers were giving)... Thanks pixeltroid!
 

Genetix

Member
The absolutely hardest part is actually completing a game - that should be your focus for now. Marketing and all of that is crucial, but doesn't mean a thing until you have a complete product. Good luck!
 

zircher

Member
I'm also in the small steps camp. If you haven't walked through the manual and every tutorial and demo that GMS offers, you're not even ready to begin. After that, I'd hit the books for advanced stuff (but then, I'm a book learner.) Don't rush to failure, work towards success. :)
 

cdgamedev

Member
The absolutely hardest part is actually completing a game - that should be your focus for now. Marketing and all of that is crucial, but doesn't mean a thing until you have a complete product. Good luck!
Alright. Thanks :D. I sometimes finish games but they're all smaller games - the project I have in mind is going to be much much bigger xD. Thanks!

I'm also in the small steps camp. If you haven't walked through the manual and every tutorial and demo that GMS offers, you're not even ready to begin. After that, I'd hit the books for advanced stuff (but then, I'm a book learner.) Don't rush to failure, work towards success.
I've been through the manual, haven't really tried any of the demos and I learn by doing things so it's probably better if I did do the demos, didn't even cross my mind haha. Thanks!
 
Personally I've found that switching back and forth between building the engine, world creation, and making the story usually ends with it sitting on my computer taking up space when I decide to move onto something else. For my latest game I'm focusing almost solely on the engine to start off with and a 'demo' to test it and then I'll start worrying about the world and story. So far so good and I've gotten more done on this game then any other project except my very first one. Your mileage may vary though.
 
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