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Tips for a 2D artist starting 3D modeling.

Null-Z

Member
while I wait for the final parts to upgrade my computer, I wanted to gather some tips to help me swiftly understand how to model in 3D.

what advise do you have? anything you wish you knew when you began 3D modeling? what tutorials do you you suggest work the best?
advise is appreciated!
 

kburkhart84

Firehammer Games
3d modelling is a big venture. Studios typically have multiple people doing multiple tasks just because of how big it is. You have people dedicated to just concept art, modelling, scultping, retopo, rigging(yes, dedicated riggers), animators, and painting(which varies depending on how they choose to do it). Its something you are going to need to bite into with small bites and learn bit by bit. If the goal is to use your models in games, you are going to need to learn at least a portion of those steps. If it is literally just about models and renders, shortcuts can be taken if you don't need animation. But either way, don't expect fast progress because its likely going to take longer than 2d art just because of how many processes are involved.
 

muki

Member
3d modelling is a big venture. Studios typically have multiple people doing multiple tasks just because of how big it is. You have people dedicated to just concept art, modelling, scultping, retopo, rigging(yes, dedicated riggers), animators, and painting(which varies depending on how they choose to do it). Its something you are going to need to bite into with small bites and learn bit by bit. If the goal is to use your models in games, you are going to need to learn at least a portion of those steps. If it is literally just about models and renders, shortcuts can be taken if you don't need animation. But either way, don't expect fast progress because its likely going to take longer than 2d art just because of how many processes are involved.
True for AAA-level 3D art, but if one is willing to simplify, and stylize a bit, one person can do 3D art. It's all about the scope.

The art in games like A Short Hike is mostly done by a single person. Because its style allows it.
 

Null-Z

Member
does anyone have some advise on what to look out for when making a model to be rigged? I presume making a static model is like molding clay but rigging it to move means you should be aware of some other things.
 

muki

Member
does anyone have some advise on what to look out for when making a model to be rigged? I presume making a static model is like molding clay but rigging it to move means you should be aware of some other things.
In max, one would create a skeleton using multiple bones, or using a biped, fitting the shape of your character that was modeled in t-pose (always model in t-pose), then setting up envelopes (how much of the character mesh the bone effects around itself) using the skin modifier. You'd probably want to spend a bit of time tweaking things with paint weights but now your character's ready to be animated. That's max, I don't know how to do it in other 3D software but I imagine the technique is similar.

It depends on the software you're using. I googled 'blender rigging' and a ton of tutorials and how-to's came up.

Your first (and second, and third) rigged character will be far from perfect. That's fine, you just have to practice. It's the same for everyone.
 

kburkhart84

Firehammer Games
True for AAA-level 3D art, but if one is willing to simplify, and stylize a bit, one person can do 3D art. It's all about the scope.

The art in games like A Short Hike is mostly done by a single person. Because its style allows it.
This is also accurate. You can skip sculpting/retopo if you just model straight out for one, and that's a big one. It is still generally much more complex than 2d art though(except that it has certain advantages as far as being able to iterate something much faster once you actually have something done.)

does anyone have some advise on what to look out for when making a model to be rigged? I presume making a static model is like molding clay but rigging it to move means you should be aware of some other things.
If you use a sculpting workflow, then yes it can indeed be like clay. However, if you don't, it isn't really like clay, as you can move geometry around directly instead of sculpting it.

About rigging, you will figure things out if you just dig in. What you need to watch out for with rigging/animating is actually about the modelling stage. Quads are best(as opposed to triangles) for animation, and you need smoother better topology. You also want extra edge loops around joints so things don't deforn strangely when you bend things like knees and elbows. These things can be good for static models too, but are much less important there.
 

larry12A

Member
The art in games like A Short Hike is mostly done by a single person. Because its style allows it.
Although, some game dev projects require dev process of a whole team, who will care about gameplay features, based on game art specific details.
 
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