Windows [SOLVED] Ideal Port/Window size

Mythi.T

Member
Im making a game (duh) . I want this game to be enjoyed by the most poeple absolutly possible. However, poeple buy a computer with a different screen size (with a different screen resolution then 1920x1024) and I dont blame them.

Heres the question:
What is the best window size / set of sizes that are compatable with the most number of popular screen resolutions. (As in compatable I mean my game window that fits on your screen nicely and you can see everything and its not to big or small). Essentially what is the BEST window size that would be most perfect for all poeple to see and all different computer resolutions to display, or a one-window-size-fits-all-screen-resolutions...

For instance, the window size I am using for my game is 1440 x 768, which is just 1920 x 1024 but 25% smaller, so i would take up 75% of a 1920x1024 resolution computer screen.

Should I keep it at that? Would smaller be better? Do I make a small window and a big window that can go back and forth? Please answer, as you all have more knowledge then me.
 

CedSharp

Member
When you play a professional game, you aren't "stuck" with a resolution, you have the ability, in the settings, to change the resolution.
Why don't you implement something like that? There are plenty of scripts to manipulate views/cameras so you could just read from a file which resolution to use.

There is no "good resolution" I would recommend you use 1920x1080 as a basis since nowadays that's usually the best.
I've never heard of 1920x1024 before.
 
N

nickvm98

Guest
I too faced this problem when I started my own game. To determine the right resolution, one must understand the history and idea of resolution.

In the early 2000's most LCD screens were 4:3 ratio around 1024 by 768, before HD was born. After a few years most CRT screens were abandoned and as computing power increased, people realised and switched to 16:9 because of how a wider screen is anatomically better for the wider horizontal view of the human eyes. It was then where 720p HD was becoming popular. As computing power increased again, more pixel meant a better graphical fidelity and immersion. After 10 years, 1920 by 1080 was the established FULL HD resolution and even now it is changing to 4k and even switching to 21:9 ultra wide screen in luxury gaming.

The point is that, as computing power increases so does the need to design different monitors of different ratio and resolution. Perhaps in 50 years, ultra mega wide monitors with 32k resolution will be the norm. The Nintendo 64 was said to be the cutting edge of graphically fidelity back in the mid 90's but it could never prepare for the unpredictable changes in computer graphics. And neither can you.

For you, I recommend any resolution thats 16:9 and is a factor of 1920 by 1080. You can add a menu for the player to choose a desired resolution but High Graphic pixel 2D art shouldn't be more than 960 by 540 (1920/2 by 1080/2). The more you divide the better FPS you'll get, as well as performance. Vector Graphics games can cheat and go on higher resolutions as the pixels are calculated not drawn and is only defined by the camera size but Pixel Art will always be out done by higher resolutions. A trick to draw sprites at higher resolutions is anti aliasing. It uses a bit mask to blur the pixels of a sprite onto a larger canvas. Different methods of anti aliasing exist and shaders can do the trick but a simple way to achieve this effect in GM is to enable interpolation of pixel.

TL DR 16:9 at 960 by 540 stretched to 1920 by 1080 with an option to change the resolution and interpolation.
 

Mythi.T

Member
For you, I recommend any resolution thats 16:9 and is a factor of 1920 by 1080. You can add a menu for the player to choose a desired resolution but High Graphic pixel 2D art shouldn't be more than 960 by 540 (1920/2 by 1080/2). The more you divide the better FPS you'll get, as well as performance. Vector Graphics games can cheat and go on higher resolutions as the pixels are calculated not drawn and is only defined by the camera size but Pixel Art will always be out done by higher resolutions. A trick to draw sprites at higher resolutions is anti aliasing. It uses a bit mask to blur the pixels of a sprite onto a larger canvas. Different methods of anti aliasing exist and shaders can do the trick but a simple way to achieve this effect in GM is to enable interpolation of pixel.

Perfect. Ill do that. It wont allow for full screen ability, (idc bout that) but most players who don't have / use 1920 by 1080 resolutions can still play.
 
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