Windows Save game file location - how to keep same for different proj version names?

Discussion in 'Game Design, Development And Publishing' started by DigiChain, Aug 26, 2019.

  1. DigiChain

    DigiChain Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2018
    Posts:
    36
    When my game saves a 'save game' file it saves it to:
    AppData > Local > Game Name as expected.

    So if my current project is called "mygame_vers1" it will save it to a folder named: AppData > Local > mygame_vers1

    If I continue working on the project, saving different version numbers as I go, and then publish an update from a new version number it no longer looks for the saved file from the previous version because it will now be looking for/saving to AppData > Local > mygame_vers33 for example.
    This obviously causes issues because an update now looks as though it has wiped the save game data.

    My solution to this is to always resave the latest version to the original name when publishing - but am I missing something? Is there a way to update the project name without effecting the games 'save file' location?
     
  2. BaBiA Game Studio

    BaBiA Game Studio Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2016
    Posts:
    845
    If you're using GMS2, why not just disable the sandbox and set the path to wherever you want your files to be saved? Then it doesn't matter what version of your game you are running as all of them will load their saved games from the same folder.
     
  3. DigiChain

    DigiChain Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2018
    Posts:
    36
    Ok, thanks. I'll have to look into that, it's not something I've done before.
     
  4. Yal

    Yal GMC Memer GMC Elder

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2016
    Posts:
    3,556
    Use git for versioning your project instead of changing its name all the time.

    Git is essentially a tool that lets you save snapshots of your project and then tie them together in a timeline... that's also a branching tree. It only saves the stuff that's changed ("diffs") that usually are pretty small (if you make snapshots often) so you can time-travel your project quickly between different versions. You can revert to a previous version if you mess something up really badly, so you can make experimental "fire and forget" branches that you can just abandon if something went wrong, etc.
     

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