Development Just a few questions.

Hi all, I'm not specifically sure what this would be applied too but I've just been wondering a few things, this might seem a bit stupid of a question to ask but when I'm just curious, at what point does code become your code and should I feel bad about using someone else's code? Obviously as it is now I've just started to get into gamemaker about 2 days ago and it's been confusing to be honest, but I can pick up some small things. Like this code I have attached is from WreckingPrograms tutorial on how to make megaman style moving/shooting. I've also watched shaun spaulding's tutorials and almost finished his 2D game tutorial. I'm just confused about whether if there's anything I'm missing, because when shaun makes a 2D collision I feel a little at odds because I can't really think of alternatives that are better to me (because I have no experience obviously). What I'm trying to get at is, do finished games people have made and sold use similar code to what's in those videos or are you supposed to just come up with a much better way to do something like that? I just feel a little bit stupid and almost like it's copying without learning/understanding.
 

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TsukaYuriko

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Forum Staff
Moderator
It's your code when you had the idea to write it the way it is written. Someone else's code will not become your code. Your modifications to someone else's code may be your modifications to someone else's code, but that doesn't turn the whole thing into your code.

You shouldn't feel bad for using someone else's code (as long as they published it with that intent). The Marketplace exists for a reason - its sole purpose is the sale, purchase and subsequent use of assets that weren't made by yourself in order to speed up development.

You should avoid using code you don't understand, though. That's like copying maths homework from a friend for a couple of weeks without understanding any of it and then writing an exam about it where you can't copy. The exam will be the point in time at which there will be no tutorial available for something you want to do - if all you've done is copying up to that point, you'll be screwed with no idea where to even start. Don't set yourself up for this crash landing into reality - take things slowly, start small and learn how things work before you use them.

There's no clear-cut answer regarding whether code assets are used in commercial games. Some may use them, some may not, some may use them in altered form. Most likely, their authors understood how they work sufficiently to be able to work with them and expand upon them, though.
 
It's your code when you had the idea to write it the way it is written. Someone else's code will not become your code. Your modifications to someone else's code may be your modifications to someone else's code, but that doesn't turn the whole thing into your code.

You shouldn't feel bad for using someone else's code (as long as they published it with that intent). The Marketplace exists for a reason - its sole purpose is the sale, purchase and subsequent use of assets that weren't made by yourself in order to speed up development.

You should avoid using code you don't understand, though. That's like copying maths homework from a friend for a couple of weeks without understanding any of it and then writing an exam about it where you can't copy. The exam will be the point in time at which there will be no tutorial available for something you want to do - if all you've done is copying up to that point, you'll be screwed with no idea where to even start. Don't set yourself up for this crash landing into reality - take things slowly, start small and learn how things work before you use them.

There's no clear-cut answer regarding whether code assets are used in commercial games. Some may use them, some may not, some may use them in altered form. Most likely, their authors understood how they work sufficiently to be able to work with them and expand upon them, though.
I understand some logistical parts of tutorials. And I dont want to solely copy and paste code, far from it. I just find it daunting that all code for every individual game is unique from one another, despite being similar. When I open a file after getting things down and trying to do it myself i just get lost.
 

Sybok

Member
I just find it daunting that all code for every individual game is unique from one another
Not really.

Once you understand what is going on and you start to develop your own style, you’ll find that you reuse a hell of a lot of code. Then you’ll find that you will start creating your own functions in their own little scripts, effectively making your own additions the the GML language in a sense.

None of this happens overnight. You’ll be honing your skills for the rest of your life. It never ends. If you stick at it you will get better and better.

Best thing I find is to experiment with things. If you don’t understand something, give it a try. You won’t break anything.

Tutorials are fine, as long as you take the time to understand what is going on. If you don’t understand something, play with it, change it around, test what happens. Then if you don’t understand, post a question. If people see you are having a decent go, they will literally spend hours of their time to help you out. The thing people hate most though is when someone does a ‘copy / paste’, bit aren’t willing to attempt to try to fix it when it goes wrong (which is alo of the time in that scenario).

Good luck! :)
 

TsukaYuriko

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Forum Staff
Moderator
When I open a file after getting things down and trying to do it myself i just get lost.
Chances are you're biting off more than you can chew, then. Whatever it is you're trying to do on your own, try something simpler first. Anytime you feel lost is a sign that you should probably take a step back and go over the basics again.

As you said, you started using GameMaker two days ago, so you can't really expect (or be expected) to do much of anything with it. At this point, you should probably be looking at the manual instead of tutorials, as tutorials often expect you to already know how to program. The exception to this are, of course, tutorials with the intention to teach you how to program, but the one you picked doesn't seem like one of those to me.

I suggest to start with the GML Overview instead, if you haven't already started it. That'll give you a solid understanding of how to program, as long as you spend as much time reading and revising it as you need to understand the topics.
 
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