Drag And Drop I would Love to Know the Steps I Need to Take in Becoming an Indie Game Developer.

Discussion in 'Game Design, Development And Publishing' started by ObsidianVortex2, Dec 19, 2018.

  1. ObsidianVortex2

    ObsidianVortex2 Member

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    Hello, everyone!! I have a few questions. I really want to be a solo indie game developer. I am total noob and I have no idea what I'm doing or where to start. I know everyone has most likely heard this story a million times but, I'm a highly creative person, very self motivated, a super introvert, an excellent problem solver, and I have self-taught myself how to make electronic music in FL Studio. I've been doing that for a few years now. Anyways, this is already all over the place haha but, I was wondering if doing online courses through Full Sail University is worth it or not. I will start February 4th, 2019. Like can I teach myself everything I need to know or no?? I am horrible at Math and I don't want to just be a programmer and I'm not talented in Art but, I'm great with writing, anything involving creativity, stories, etc. I also really really want to make a difference in the world through the power of video games. I just have no idea what to do and I'm lost and I'm looking for some guidance!! Please someone get back to me, it'd be much appreciated!!
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2018
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  2. Neptune

    Neptune Member

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    Motivation is good. Discipline is better.
    I recommend just diving in -- and if you want to be an "indie" developer, I would practice art as much / more than coding (GIMP 2 is free).
    Shaun Spalding tutorials is where I started ( and highly regarded by most of the GM community) https://www.youtube.com/user/999Greyfox/videos

    You're gonna do great! Ask LOTS of questions, use the nice community thats available to you, and the GM manual https://docs2.yoyogames.com/

    (Make this forum your home: https://forum.yoyogames.com/index.php?forums/programming.13/)
    Oh, and welcome to the community :D
     
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  3. ajan-ko

    ajan-ko Member

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    First, you need to know what is your endgoal. Do you want to make games, or do you want to work in game company, or do you want to make studio? Those 3 things are different.

    Second, you need to know your talent and the combination to create winning formula. As you say, you're really good at writing, decent at FL studio, my guess is you want to make a story based game (like to the moon), so focus on story and music, since those 2 thing is your forte, to the moon has crappy art, but the music and story outstanding.

    For programming, just learn it, but don't too deep about it, after all story based game it should be have shallow programming.

    Third, money and connection are power. No matter you have your own ideals, money can bring you closer to your ideals. You can buy skill with money. For example you can buy programmer or art with money, or you can just take course. Since your games is textbased, you need a typewriter, that thing need money. So learn to make money.
     
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  4. ObsidianVortex2

    ObsidianVortex2 Member

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    That's what I plan on doing all day today and for a while haha. Okay will do. I have heard of GIMP 2 before. I also subscribed to him on YouTube the other day. Thank you!! You too!! Trust me I will. Oh sweet I didn't know where the manual was. I'll bookmark that. Thank you!!

    My end goal is to make video games. Yes I would love to make a story-based game. Okay will do. Yes they are. How much programming should I learn then?? So, by getting a job??
     
  5. Neptune

    Neptune Member

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    Learn all of it. Money and connections are fine, but when it comes down to it... You either produce good content, or you dont.
    Non-developers are very visual, which is one reason art is so important. Code is equally important, because you want your art to be applied in a fun and exciting way. Sound brings life to your game (which is also very important!).
     
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  6. ObsidianVortex2

    ObsidianVortex2 Member

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    Ah I see. Well, thank you!!
     
  7. Toque

    Toque Member

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    My advice is make a simple game and see if you love it as much as you think you will.

    I would start by doing it as a hobby.

    It can be challenging but enjoy the challenge. It’s lots of fun to.

    Watch tutorials and just dive in.
     
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  8. Yal

    Yal Member GMC Elder

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    I agree with @Vether , it's good to know everything in game development (code, art, sound, writing, level design, gameplay design)... even if you'll just get outside help or stock assets for everything, knowing the basics of how the stuff works always comes in handy... e.g., making reasonable demands of artists, going for game ideas that are feasible to create, choosing the right formats for assets.
     
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  9. HeWhoShallNotBeNamed

    HeWhoShallNotBeNamed Member

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    First of all, welcome to the world of game design. It's always good to see someone come into it looking to change the world and not just try to cash in on the latest trends. Its also good to see someone who finds story in games important. We can't have enough of that. If I could offer some advice (and as someone whose almost got a full battle system in place I'm more than qualified to offer advice), keep things basic while you're starting out. Avoid adding things just because they seem "cool"- if its not in service to the other systems in your game, its just feature creep and you're never going to finish your game. You can come up with new ideas much faster than you could ever possibly execute them. You can't win that game.

    Remember that being able to write code correctly isn't as important as being able to figure out what went wrong and where without getting too discouraged/frustrated. If you've taught yourself FL Studio, you can probably teach yourself GMS.

    As for the math thing, you can do a lot with some basic algebra skills. Some things may require some higher math, but a basic grasp of variables can take you far.

    Make a checklist of things you want to accomplish. I'm not talking big picture things, I'm talking about things like "Add Room Transition Effect" or "Create Test Enemy Sprite." I have a dry erase board with about a dozen things on it, and every time I get to check something off, it feels like a victory. This will keep your mind on moving forward one step at a time and not on how far you still have to go.

    Good luck with all your future games!
     
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  10. ajan-ko

    ajan-ko Member

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    So my question is, what skill you can sell to public? I depends on your circumtances. My circumtances is, I can sell my programming skill.

    Overall, only you can answer your question:

    If you think you can sell your writing skill, then go sell your writing skill.
    If you think you can sell your music making skill, sell your music making skill.
    If you think you can sell your programming skill, then sell your programming skill, go into good IT company and makes games in your free time.

    The thing is, you have limited free time, and learning stuff require time and money.
    Bottom line, make money, it doesn't matter if you passionate or not. Just get it done.
    or, If you suck at making money, strategize to get more free time while making enough money to survive, that's works too... But, keep in mind you need to deal with financial insecurities.

    After you have the money, it's up to you to create your own art, and follow your passion.

    Money making skill + Passion = Win.

    If your financial are okay, just take online/offline course and learn. I think to learn programming takes 1 years to be half decent. Pretty fast if you compare it to learning music. But different people have different talent.

    After you can do half decent programming, buy some art asset. In itch.io or unity store there's lot of cheap graphic asset, put that on your game and have fun with it.

    Viola. Now you're a game developer.

    Basically, a game require 3 things: program, art, and music. Sell your strength, while buy the weak part.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2018
  11. Niels

    Niels Member

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    Have you made any prior games? I ask this because there is a difference in dreaming of becoming a Gamedev, and actually making games:)
     
  12. Misty

    Misty Member

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    get gud
     
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  13. Yal

    Yal Member GMC Elder

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    1. Make games.
    2. There is no step two.
     
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  14. sitebender

    sitebender Member

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    Step 1: Art before anything else. If you can't get people interested in your game before its a game, you've already failed as a developer.

    Step 2: Promotion. You'd think the game should be made BEFORE you promote it, but no.

    Step 3: Make the game while you continue promoting it.

    Step 4: Make connections that can get you places.

    Step 5: Take advice about game, build a following and demand for the game.

    Step 6: Price accordingly.

    Fail any one of these steps and you've just wasted any time and effort you've invested. Any effort that you do put in... put in 10x more into promoting it.

    If you're just learning how to make games... go for step 3, and keep repeating step 3.
     
  15. Misty

    Misty Member

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    Maybe in 2018 with activision but that is not how games should be made.

    You are talking about capitalism and not game design. Not that I'm suprised, this is the era of greed, asset flips, market oversaturation, and EA games, I am not surprised gaming would fall so far as to be reduced to such as state as to spammy ads of early access overhyped amateurish shovelware, call of duty and mountain dew determining the basis of 'good game design". Might as well promote microtransactions as well while we're at it...Madden 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021...just make sure to spam ads and overhype it...even if its your first game and you have zero experience...spam it and act like its going to be game of the year...that's "game design" of the future...
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
  16. deem93

    deem93 Member

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    I've been working on my first game for the past two years, right now it's near completion and in my experience the most important thing to learn is problem solving.
    There are many moving elements in a game, and each one is a problem to solve. Things can often break, features stop working or may require redesigning as your game changes and evolves from initial vision.
    Behind every hill there is another hill to climb. Most of the time you operate in failure, so it is vital to focus on finding solutions and not getting discouraged by hitting a brick wall.
    In addition, it is good to, every now and again, step back for a while and reassess the direction and scope of your game.
    If you need help with something, you can always ask questions on the programming forum.
    Good luck!
     
  17. Cpaz

    Cpaz Member

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    Project management and documentation is also very important.
    List everything you have planned for the foreseeable future and take notes on any errors and important changes you make.

    Documentation is key to maintaining features
     
  18. 11clock

    11clock Member

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    1. Download game development software.

    2. Start using it.

    Congrats, you are now an indie game developer.
     
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