Hours of Hardwork Marketing

Discussion in 'Game Design, Development And Publishing' started by JayR, Sep 27, 2018.

  1. JayR

    JayR Member

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    Not sure if this is the right place... But how do you guys market your game? After spending hours working on a game you'd hope of people to be playing it and giving you constructive criticism, maybe a couple of compliments like "This is a FUN game!" to keep you going. What if no one cares? Maybe no one knows your game even existed? Perhaps no one knows how to find it? What can a small developer do to reach out to them amidst the noise of behemoths ever dominating the market?
     
  2. NazGhuL

    NazGhuL NazTaiL

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    Hi. My game will be out October 8th. Steam page right here: https://store.steampowered.com/app/939540/Space_Ashes/
    I'm a one man developer and marketing is probably the most difficult task I ever did. :D
    Get at least 1 social media account. (I choose twitter)
    Get a webpage.
    Post with accurate hashtag like #indiedev, #gamedev, etc...
    This video is very accurate on the process:



    As for now, I delivered around 50 mails with press-steam key to press and youtubers.
    I released around 30 keys to different Steam Curators.
    Still posting on it.
    Just saying 'this is a fun' game is not enough.
    You have to keep working hard and create a very good game with a lot of love in it!

    Some will. If it's good enough.

    That will surely happens. Don't worry.

    Twitter, webpage and this problem is fixed.

    Work/create with passion. (And by the way, this works in every sphere of your life. Some call this Karma.)
     
    JayR and IndianaBones like this.
  3. Genetix

    Genetix Member

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    First and foremost - Share (but don't spam) your game with friends & family.

    Make sure that you are taking advantage of social media, post screenshots, GIFS, and videos of your project across Youtube, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, Forums (such as this one), and anywhere else you can think of.

    When the game is released try and share it with reviewers on Youtube, gaming site, Twitch streamers that generally cover other games like yours.

    If a fan reaches out make sure you respond. Respond to any reviews and work to turn players into loyal fans!

    Good luck!
     
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  4. ajan-ko

    ajan-ko Member

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    My games bombed in sales (ahahahah~ :3), but that's the beauty of this industry.

    It depends, if you're market it on steam, then I agree with those video.
    But if you want to promote your free to play games, I think you need to put some money on facebooks ads, or find small mobile gaming youtuber and email them one per one.
    It's a grind process.

    My biggest mistake is trying to complete with mainstream gendre. Niche is your vocal point as indie. Fail early also one of the keypoint.

    You never win with your first game, unless you're already a player in marketing industry.
     
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  5. sitebender

    sitebender Member

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    The better the style and presentation, the further you'll go. Your signature's quality of art means a lot.

    I remember a gamedev keynote speech where the speaker explained he only works on the game 8 hours in a 40 hour week. The other 42 is spent promoting the game. You need to get people to care about the game long before it's ever released. That's why so many betas released years prior to a game's release is so similar to the finished product.

    My friends are a big form of publicity. That's really the only people I make games for.

    I do the Reddit, Twitter, Youtube and Facebook, but for me, it goes no where. About once a year I have a post that catches fire, but it never goes beyond that. People seem to love art and animations.

    People tell me to get my games to the press all at once rather than a trickle effect. If your game appears everywhere, it looks like a much bigger, must have game.

    Also ask questions, get feedback and it will keep threads bumped.
     
  6. Misty

    Misty Member

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    What do you mean by fail early?
     
  7. sitebender

    sitebender Member

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    Would you rather fail at 1 month or 3 months?
     
  8. ajan-ko

    ajan-ko Member

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    So basically, when you develop a game, you want to publish at 3 month, and 6 month max development. If you way past 4 month mark, it's best to just finish the game at that point, and publish below 6 month. Adding new feature at that point will be dissaterous, especially if you never make games before. If you think the feature is too much, just abbandon your 1st game.

    Your next game will be something you can make in 3-6 month, but using some code from your first game (or some artwork). At certain point you will have LOTS of legacy code that you can use to make bigger project faster. So, you need to strategize your resource for each mini project you worked on. Your 2nd games will be finished in 6 month, or you might have developing abbandoning habbit, so make sure lower your bar.

    The next problem you faced is probably how to market your games, how marketing works, how cashflow works. So if you don't publish your games, you never learn how to market your game.

    Yes, you can do 7 years development like some indie games, but that's require tons of talent and luck to be that successfull.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2018 at 6:16 AM

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