Have to build a new machine

Kezarus

Member
Aaaaand my machine died... I can power it off, but it's absolute hell to power it back on. Maybe it's the power button, maybe its the power source, idk. I'm keeping it on forever until I buy a new one.

I made a setup (sorry for Portuguese =/), but I have no idea if this is good or not and I have a lot of questions. Here it is:

MOTHERBOARD: Placa-Mãe Gigabyte B365M DS3H, Intel LGA 1151, mATX, DDR4
VIDEO CARD: Placa de Vídeo Gigabyte NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti OC 4G, GDDR5 - GV-N105TOC-4GD
CPU: Processador Intel Core i7-9700KF Coffee Lake Refresh, Cache 12MB, 3.6GHz (4.9GHz Max Turbo), LGA 1151, Sem Vídeo - BX80684I79700KF
MEMORY: Memória HyperX Fury RGB, 16GB, 2666MHz, DDR4, CL16, Preto - HX426C16FB3A/16
HD: HD WD Blue, 1TB, 3.5´, SATA - WD10EZEX
COOLER: Cooler para Processador Cooler Master HYPER H410R com LED Vermelho RR-H410-20PK-R1
POWER SOURCE: Fonte EVGA 700W, 80 Plus Bronze - 100-BR-0700-K
CABINET: Gabinete Sharkoon TG5 Blue Vidro Temperado 4mm Led Fan 12cm ATX



Questions:
  1. Video Card: is it any good? Are better video cards or this is good enough?
  2. CPU: I think it's top of the line and i9 is a steal here. Are this i7 good?
  3. HD: I will just plop my old SSD HD on the new machine. Can I do that without much of a fuss? I'm using Windows 10 and would like to keep all installed softwares.
  4. Cooler: is this enough for the CPU?
  5. Power Source: I think 700W is good, but how can I be sure? Where do I look for power needs?
  6. Cabinet: I think it supports all my parts, how can I be sure?


Any help is greatly appreciated!
Thanks a lot! =]
 

Padouk

Member
Depending on how long you tend to keep your computers.
I would consider the i7 10th generation (Intel Core i7-10700) instead of 9th (i7-9700)
It has better power consumption and provide up to 128GB of ram support which might be interesting later down the road.

In my country they are already cheaper as well
 

Kezarus

Member
@Padouk, nice! It seems to be a better choice, really. I know nothing about hardware unfotunately.

I'm in Brazil, those parts are expensive as hell. I'm expending an entire monthly paycheck just to setup this one. =/

Where are you from?
 

EvanSki

Raccoon Jam Host
  1. Video Card: is it any good? Are better video cards or this is good enough?
  2. CPU: I think it's top of the line and i9 is a steal here. Are this i7 good?
  3. HD: I will just plop my old SSD HD on the new machine. Can I do that without much of a fuss? I'm using Windows 10 and would like to keep all installed softwares.
  4. Cooler: is this enough for the CPU?
  5. Power Source: I think 700W is good, but how can I be sure? Where do I look for power needs?
  6. Cabinet: I think it supports all my parts, how can I be sure?
  1. Yes, if you're looking for gaming you should be able to play some decent AAA games
  2. i7 is decent but Im startingto look at amd like that boyfriend meme
  3. Should be fine, you're old drivers will be bloot, but windows should get default drivers for the new hardware then you should run the setups for the graphics card and such
  4. Idk heat, I just use fans and check my pc temp when running to see if its too hot
  5. Look up how much power your, cpu,ram,and gpu need then combine it so lets say 500w,500w,700w, you'd need at the least a 700w PS
  6. Look at the size of the tower, and the interface ports and see if its big enough and if the io ports are what you need

Hope I've helped, Good luck on the new rig!
 
The setup will serve you fine. You can plug your SSD into your new machine, but you may want (and need) to reinstall Windows. The power supply will run everything. The case is designed for ATX motherboards, but you're going mATX. You'll have more than enough space, but cable management may be less ideal, depending on how much you care about that. The cooler should be fine, but given the case you've decided upon, you do have room to go bigger.
 

Kezarus

Member
Thanks a ton, mates! You are helping me a lot in making a new PC. I'm changing some configs about processor and video card.

It's reassuring to know that I will be able to keep all installed softwares... GM 1.4 is among them, and I have a Steam game made in it. If I lose that I don't think I could install it again considering some posts I saw in the past. Let alone buy a new license for it. o.Ô
 

GMWolf

aka fel666
Depending on what you plan on doing, dont overdo it on the CPU.

If you are going to do lots of heavy compilation, video rendering, or audio rendering, then a beefy CPU is needed.

If you just want to use Game Maker and play games, you dont need anything top of the line, the money would be better spent on a higher end video card (assuming you want to play AAA games).


If electricity prices are high, it's worth doing the calculations To see if a higher efficiency Psu would pay itself back. (Often not the case)
 
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Note that unless I'm specifically saying something is bad, most of my ideas for what is good price/performance-wise is informed by USA prices on these parts and I'm trying to correct for Brazil prices in my recommendations.

1. 1050ti is still a decent budget option. You can play virtually anything at 1080p without breaking the bank. Depending on what you want to play (mostly newer AAA games), you will probably have to turn down a lot of settings, though. As GMWolf suggested, if you're mostly planning on gaming a GM, drop down the CPU a bit and spend more on the video card. It's more than worth it in that case.

2. Not quite top of the line. The 9700KF will still be competitive when it comes to pushing game performance, but it's a last gen model and AMD's current chips are destroying Intel right now. That said, good luck being able to buy the latter with the current market situation! I'm going to assume it's dropped in price because of that and offers the best price-performance ratio.

3. Windows might complain at you for changing too many parts and you may have to purchase a new license. That isn't a big deal, especially in countries where selling used software isn't even remotely a grey area and you can just buy a third-party key for virtually nothing. HOWEVER, I still recommend a full reinstall if you're building something from scratch. There is so much that can go wrong, even if it looks like everything is working fine. Driver errors especially are notorious for causing all sorts of strange problems when transferring an installation from one system to the next.

4. No. Straight up, not powerful enough. The Hyper 410R looks like a small form factor Hyper 212 Evo, which I have used before. The latter is the absolute bare minimum I would recommend for an i7. Anything less-powerful is going to lead to lots of heat when doing anything remotely requiring processing power. Basically anything is going to be fine as long as it doesn't advertise "It's small!" as a selling point and doesn't look like obvious Chinese-made garbage.

5. 700W is more than enough for what you have. Note that you generally want your PSU to stay at around 50% usage when under load if efficiency is a concern. Here's a power supply estimation calculator: https://outervision.com/power-supply-calculator

6. https://pcpartpicker.com/ is your friend. Just select all your parts, and it will usually do a great job telling you if something doesn't fit or if there are other problems.
 

kburkhart84

Firehammer Games
I for one would second the votes for a more powerful GPU...the budget due to scarcity is the big issue though. Under normal circumstances I would typically recommend the mid-range card of the current(or maybe last) generation...you are looking TWO generation behind, which may be necessary due to the current issues.

A lot of the same point can be made for the CPU. Ryzen is kicking it right now, but it is hard to find anything. As far as making sure the CPU is compatible with the Motherboard...they are generally compatible if they have the same socket type. In some cases though the motherboard doesn't support newer CPUs that kept the same socket, so you just need to check the motherboard specs out to make sure. You also need to make sure the motherboard supports the speed of RAM you are getting. nacho_chicken mentioned above as well, that part picker website is a godsend for people not fully aware of all these things, and even for people who DO know.

Windows....last I understood it, the DRM was done on the motherboard, and generally changing it out would cause the Windows license to go invalid. I'm not sure, but you may be able to get Microsoft to fix that, but considering this is a new machine, it is going to have too many new parts to really be applicable to keeping the old OS license. Remember that Microsoft no longer does new Windows versions and so they will be more stickler about new machines using new valid licenses(that's where the money comes from with OS sales since you don't pay to upgrade versions anymore).

As far as the power supply, you generally want to just add up the main parts usage, add a good 25% - 50% or so over the top, and that's your wattage. Unless you just go extreme, there isn't that much of a difference in prices from my experience to where you really have to focus on minimizing this specific part like that. There are pages that give good estimates on how much power parts use, and the GPU and CPU specs will show what those use as well. For what you have now atleast, 700W would be fine.

RAM, 16GB is enough for almost everything these days, although 32GB is pretty much the "sweet-spot" these days as far as future proofing it atleast somewhat. 64GB would be nice, but depending on how often you replace your machine, even 32GB may not be needed. If you plan to keep it as long as possible however, I think 32GB will be better.

My last though....is there a reason you haven't considered a pre-built machine? From what I understand, the vendors have access to the CPU/GPU parts at more normal pricing, so they haven't inflated them so much like if you buy them yourself. Under normal circumstances it makes good sense for some people to go ahead and build, but with current prices a lot of that advantage is gone. And it would save you the hassle of building, finding parts, the slight risk of DOA parts, compatibility, and then some.
 

Kezarus

Member
Thanks for you advices @nacho_chicken and @GMWolf ! =]

1. 1050ti is still a decent budget option. You can play virtually anything at 1080p without breaking the bank. Depending on what you want to play (mostly newer AAA games), you will probably have to turn down a lot of settings, though. As GMWolf suggested, if you're mostly planning on gaming a GM, drop down the CPU a bit and spend more on the video card. It's more than worth it in that case.
Hmmm, ok. I don't usually play AAA, but I like to have a good machine for 4 to 5 years. Maybe I have to ramp up the video card under that circunstance. Next upgrade will be post 2025.


2. Not quite top of the line. The 9700KF will still be competitive when it comes to pushing game performance, but it's a last gen model and AMD's current chips are destroying Intel right now. That said, good luck being able to buy the latter with the current market situation! I'm going to assume it's dropped in price because of that and offers the best price-performance ratio.
AMD is a problem here. My brother already lost a CPU due to overheating. The average temperature here is around 30ºC/25ºC. = |
And if external market is bad, think about here where the currency devalued a LOT because Covid... US$1 where around R$ 4.2, now it's R$ 5.5 and going up. Crazy times. I was holding this machine as much as possible, but it's at Deaths Door right now.


3. Windows might complain at you for changing too many parts and you may have to purchase a new license. That isn't a big deal, especially in countries where selling used software isn't even remotely a grey area and you can just buy a third-party key for virtually nothing. HOWEVER, I still recommend a full reinstall if you're building something from scratch. There is so much that can go wrong, even if it looks like everything is working fine. Driver errors especially are notorious for causing all sorts of strange problems when transferring an installation from one system to the next.
Yeeeeah... so... I tend to buy everything as legal as possible. Maybe the Windows license that I have will still be good. A full reinstalation will probably remove all the programs that I have and some, like GM 1.4, I can't even reinstall. Let's..... hope for the best.


4. No. Straight up, not powerful enough. The Hyper 410R looks like a small form factor Hyper 212 Evo, which I have used before. The latter is the absolute bare minimum I would recommend for an i7. Anything less-powerful is going to lead to lots of heat when doing anything remotely requiring processing power. Basically anything is going to be fine as long as it doesn't advertise "It's small!" as a selling point and doesn't look like obvious Chinese-made garbage.
Nice, that's another thing that I will check again. Thanks! =D


5. 700W is more than enough for what you have. Note that you generally want your PSU to stay at around 50% usage when under load if efficiency is a concern. Here's a power supply estimation calculator: https://outervision.com/power-supply-calculator
6. https://pcpartpicker.com/ is your friend. Just select all your parts, and it will usually do a great job telling you if something doesn't fit or if there are other problems.
Wow! Those links are really usefull! O_O Thanks a lot mate!
 

Kezarus

Member
RAM, 16GB is enough for almost everything these days, although 32GB is pretty much the "sweet-spot" these days as far as future proofing it atleast somewhat. 64GB would be nice, but depending on how often you replace your machine, even 32GB may not be needed. If you plan to keep it as long as possible however, I think 32GB will be better.
Ow, I'm going for a 4x16Gb of Ram, that's for sure. I upgrade onde every 4 years or more.


My last though....is there a reason you haven't considered a pre-built machine? From what I understand, the vendors have access to the CPU/GPU parts at more normal pricing, so they haven't inflated them so much like if you buy them yourself. Under normal circumstances it makes good sense for some people to go ahead and build, but with current prices a lot of that advantage is gone. And it would save you the hassle of building, finding parts, the slight risk of DOA parts, compatibility, and then some.
Yeah... I have to keep my old SSD that is very good and have everything installed. I hope nothing goes that wrong with Windows. If I need to buy another licence so be it. But a clean HD format is not an option unfortunatelly.


I also just have contacted a VERY good mate that does this kind of job (PC assembling). It was about 4 years since the last contact and I was affraind I had lost the contact, but he is still up for the job! Just sent the machine specs as kindly provided and pointed out for you good people. It's not gonna be cheap... but for something that I use 16h a day it needs to be as good as possible.


Can't thank you all enough for the help you are giving me! Cheers! =]
 
There shouldn't be a problem with your Windows license so long as you link your Microsoft account. I'm running both my old prebuilt Acer and my new custom rig off of the same OEM license the former came with.
 

TsukaYuriko

☄️
Forum Staff
Moderator
Nationally certified IT specialist at your service. :) A lot of helpful replies and links have been posted already, so I'll try to clear up any remaining stuff and go into a bit more detail to allow you to make informed decisions on your own based on everything else that has been posted. (Roughly 10 new replies have been posted since I started writing this one, so some stuff may have been mentioned by now.)

Aaaaand my machine died... I can power it off, but it's absolute hell to power it back on. Maybe it's the power button, maybe its the power source, idk. I'm keeping it on forever until I buy a new one.
Which hardware is in this PC? You may be able to re-use parts of it for the new one. This is a bit of a double-edged sword since you don't know which part of the old one died, and may very well be migrating the issue from the old PC to the new one by doing so... but you could theoretically save money by doing so, and if you don't re-use a substantial portion of the parts, chances are you'll be able to track down which one is the faulty one by process of elimination. Just an idea if the budget is a big concern.

Note that you shouldn't really do this depending on the age of this PC, as planned obsolescence may put a spoke in that wheel because hardware components are designed to fail after a couple of years.

I made a setup (sorry for Portuguese =/), but I have no idea if this is good or not and I have a lot of questions. Here it is:

MOTHERBOARD: Placa-Mãe Gigabyte B365M DS3H, Intel LGA 1151, mATX, DDR4
VIDEO CARD: Placa de Vídeo Gigabyte NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti OC 4G, GDDR5 - GV-N105TOC-4GD
CPU: Processador Intel Core i7-9700KF Coffee Lake Refresh, Cache 12MB, 3.6GHz (4.9GHz Max Turbo), LGA 1151, Sem Vídeo - BX80684I79700KF
MEMORY: Memória HyperX Fury RGB, 16GB, 2666MHz, DDR4, CL16, Preto - HX426C16FB3A/16
HD: HD WD Blue, 1TB, 3.5´, SATA - WD10EZEX
COOLER: Cooler para Processador Cooler Master HYPER H410R com LED Vermelho RR-H410-20PK-R1
POWER SOURCE: Fonte EVGA 700W, 80 Plus Bronze - 100-BR-0700-K
CABINET: Gabinete Sharkoon TG5 Blue Vidro Temperado 4mm Led Fan 12cm ATX
Just like how characters in RPGs can be good at different roles depending on their stats and skills, PCs can be good at different roles depending on their hardware configuration. So the most important question here is: What do you want this PC to be capable of? Can't be a wall if your defense and HP are low, if you catch my drift. Knowing what you want will be immensely helpful in helping you pick out the right parts - that is, not missing out in crucial areas and not going overboard with no benefit either.

Video Card: is it any good? Are better video cards or this is good enough?
There certainly are better GPUs than this. In terms of Nvidia's latest releases that are better than this one, you have the higher-ranked 10xx series GPUs, and then there's the 20xx and 30xx series, the latter of which is virtually sold out everywhere while the former sometimes tends to be sold for more than its MSRP at launch due to the aforementioned impossibility of buying a 30xx series GPU combined with people still needing to buy new GPUs once in a while. In general, right now is about the worst time to buy a GPU that I could imagine.

Regarding whether it's good enough, I can't make any qualified statements without knowing what is supposed to run on it. It is a budget option GPU, therefore newer games will not run at max settings (with "newer" being stretched a bit because the GPU itself is quite old already). Whether this is a problem depends on your use case.

CPU: I think it's top of the line and i9 is a steal here. Are this i7 good?
It was close to top of the line of the high end range last generation.

Also, to clarify about the "i-something": This is largely a product line label that carries no real meaning (anymore). They used to clearly differentiate between subsets of features (e.g. hyperthreading used to be exclusive to anything labeled i7), but the borders have merged for quite some time now (there are i5s with hyperthreading now). Something labeled i9 is not necessarily better than something labeled i7 for any particular purpose due to a variety of factors, including but not limited to single core performance, power consumption and whether or not you can make full use of all of the additional features one provides over the other. Kinda like if the only real meaningful difference between two CPUs is that one of them supports hyperthreading and the other doesn't, if you don't use hyperthreading at all, then getting the more expensive one won't give you any benefits. The "i-something" classification does give you a rough idea of the target audience, though, with i3 targeting the low end, i5 mid range, i7 high end and i9 targeting enthusiasts.

What's good here largely depends on what you use it for. If this PC is supposed to play newer games that can take advantage of multi-core CPUs, having more cores can be advantageous. If you only intend to play GM games, though, you'll want to make sure it has good single core performance, as GM games only use one core and can not take advantage of multi-core CPUs directly.

Finally, beware of the "F" in that CPU's name. For Intel's CPUs, this denotes a CPU that would normally have an integrated GPU, but does not (to be more specific, it has it perma-disabled). This may or may not be relevant to you. For example, it is relevant for me for the purpose of running Windows 10 in a virtual machine under KVM with hardware isolation, as this requires a dedicated GPU to be isolated and thus requires a secondary GPU (the integrated one) to boot the host operating system. Just something to keep in mind, but in general, unless you KNOW you need the integrated GPU, you don't need it.


(Insert obligatory "AMD" reference here, but you said that's a problem... with availability, I presume? So I won't go into that here. If you're concerned about them running hotter than Intel stuff, AMD is actually taking the lead here at the moment.)

HD: I will just plop my old SSD HD on the new machine. Can I do that without much of a fuss? I'm using Windows 10 and would like to keep all installed softwares.
Before you do this: What is your Windows license? This doesn't have anything to do with the SSD itself, but has everything to do with Microsoft's licensing model. If your license is an "OEM" license (which is likely the case if you bought a pre-built PC from a store), then that license is bound to the motherboard of your PC and changing it (or, in other words, putting the SSD in a different PC) will cause Windows to throw a hissy fit and you'll be looking at additional fees for getting a new license. If you have a retail license (e.g. bought from Microsoft's online store, NOT bundled with the PC purchase), this is not an issue.

That aside, this should indeed be plop and go.

Cooler: is this enough for the CPU?
This is a low profile cooler designed to fit into cases with limited space. You have a standard ATX case. This cooler's performance is not on par with full-size coolers, and given that the CPU you mentioned is not on the low performance side by any means, I wouldn't sign off on this without a huge asterisk. Your CPU is designed for overclocking, and I have my doubts whether this cooler will be able to keep up with that. Of course, that's only if you are going to overclock your CPU, and if you aren't going to, you should probably not spend extra on a CPU that is designed for overclocking.

Power Source: I think 700W is good, but how can I be sure? Where do I look for power needs?
As a base line, add the TDP of your CPU, CPU cooler and GPU. These are listed on the manufacturers' sites. If you overclock anything, you have to factor that in as well.

With PSUs, you usually want more headroom than you need for various reasons, the main one being that if you run out of power, everything shuts down, and you don't want that under any circumstances. Another is efficiency, as PSUs tend to run most efficient at around 50% load. This is why, after initial calculations, I roughly double the wattage and then add some - if my CPU, cooler and GPU have a combined TDP of 350W, I'd go with a 700W~800W power supply. This leaves enough headroom for other components (which is not as substantial as those three "main" power suckers, but still to be considered), offers some room for upgrades with higher performance components in the future and lets the PSU run around 50% or a bit higher load for close to maximum efficiency. This keeps the power bill down by a bit, probably not by a lot, but every bit helps if you intend to keep this system for a long time.

Definitely do not cheap out on this part and only buy from reliable vendors. A bad PSU is the fastest way to fry your hardware... and therefore your budget.

Cabinet: I think it supports all my parts, how can I be sure?
The most important part is the form factor (ATX in this case). This is normed, so an ATX motherboard will, in 99.9% of all cases, fit into an ATX case unless it is obstructed by some other component inside the case either of the vendors was careless enough to put there. Your motherboard is mATX, as in micro ATX. Due to the smaller size, it will have less features than an ATX motherboard, most notably the expansion slots. If you plan to use anything other than a GPU that uses PCIe slots (e.g. capture cards, extra USB controllers, non-onboard network cards...), you may run into problems due to lacking slots.

Another thing to pay attention to is the dimensions of the GPU (length-wise and depth-wise) and the CPU cooler (depth-wise). Look up the dimensions of these two on their manufacturers' sites and match them against the inner dimensions of the case, give or take a bit (as the motherboard itself also takes up space and is not mounted directly to the back wall of the case).

Yeeeeah... so... I tend to buy everything as legal as possible. Maybe the Windows license that I have will still be good. A full reinstalation will probably remove all the programs that I have and some, like GM 1.4, I can't even reinstall.
You are supposed to be able to download, install and use 1.x if you own a valid license, so this should not be a concern. (Otherwise, please file a ticket.)

Also note that you do not have to reinstall Windows if you purchase a new license. Just update the license and you're good to go.


Overall... for the highest possible accuracy of consultation, we'd need to know in greater detail what kind of things you use the PC for. The types of games you play, types of games you develop and anything else you do that can't be described as "basic office usage". Basically, anything you wouldn't trust your grandma to do on her PC can be considered. :)

Especially when you're talking about 64 GB of RAM, there are very few cases where you actually benefit from this much RAM. RAM capacity doesn't offer much of a performance increase, only a performance decrease - or crash - if it runs out, so if you have 32 GB of RAM sitting idle, that's 32 GB of wasted money. I'm not saying that you definitely don't have a need for it, just want to make sure you will actually benefit from everything you invest in.
 

GMWolf

aka fel666
AMD is a problem here. My brother already lost a CPU due to overheating. The average temperature here is around 30ºC/25ºC. = |
Current gen ryzen is more power efficient than intel. Ie, less heat!
Dont bother with water cooling btw. Just get a big noctua air cooler. (Cant gonwrong with NHD 15, that will cool most anything. NHu12A Is more sensible).

I dont think 32Gbs of ram is useful yet atm. Ni games need it, GameMaker defo doesn't need it.
If you do video rendering or 3d rendering, go for it. Otherwise just stick to 16.

If you go ryzen, make sure you get a ram kit that can match your CPUs frequency.

For CPU I might even recommend going a few generations back on AMD for budget. A 2600 will still perform rather well.

For intel I would stick to last couple gens. Their high core count CPUs tend to be a lot more expensive than their lower core count CPUs and for many workloads will perform worse. So make sure your workload can actually leverage high core counts. (For games and GM development, 6 cores is a good place to be; those workloads usually only leverage up to 4 threads effectively )

If you dont plan on playing graphics intensive games, maybe get an APU/iGPU, and get a higher end GPU later if you get the budget and want to play graphics intensive games. (Money you put now in a dedicated GPU is money you can't use for an upgrade down the line). But that really depends on the games you want to be playing.

Oh and yeah, if it's just not turning on... could just be some lose wires inside the case...
 
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ChrisC

Member
I would recommend not getting a i7, instead go with an i5 and use that money toward a better gpu. i7 could possibly help for video encoding and stuff but for gaming the i5 and i7s are 1% or less difference where a better gpu you can see a 10-20% gain. other than that I would recommend a faster ram like a 3200mhz, try to get one with a low CL rating like a 15 or 16.
 

kburkhart84

Firehammer Games
Yeah... I have to keep my old SSD that is very good and have everything installed. I hope nothing goes that wrong with Windows. If I need to buy another licence so be it. But a clean HD format is not an option unfortunatelly.
Why not? In all honesty, even if you weren't getting a new PC, you should ALWAYS be prepared in case you ever have to do a fresh install. Your data should always be backed up. SSDs don't last forever, and a bad piece of luck can easily shoot you in the foot. Some people even re-install Windows on a set schedule(like yearly) to keep things going as fast as possible.

Is there any other reason you aren't interested in a pre-built machine? I wouldn't be surprised if you can get a much better machine for the price of these components you are buying.

Finally, if it is just data you are worried about, you can always just backup the data somewhere else, or if the drive is SATA SSD it is very easy to attach it to the new machine to get the data.
 
Hmmm, ok. I don't usually play AAA, but I like to have a good machine for 4 to 5 years. Maybe I have to ramp up the video card under that circunstance. Next upgrade will be post 2025.
If you want to play games for years going forward, yeah. A 1050ti isn't going to cut it, unfortunately :/

AMD is a problem here. My brother already lost a CPU due to overheating. The average temperature here is around 30ºC/25ºC. = |
And if external market is bad, think about here where the currency devalued a LOT because Covid... US$1 where around R$ 4.2, now it's R$ 5.5 and going up. Crazy times. I was holding this machine as much as possible, but it's at Deaths Door right now.
I second everything GMWolf said above on Intel vs. AMD on power consumption/heat.

Yeeeeah... so... I tend to buy everything as legal as possible. Maybe the Windows license that I have will still be good. A full reinstalation will probably remove all the programs that I have and some, like GM 1.4, I can't even reinstall. Let's..... hope for the best.
Definitely check for your country, but buying a second-hand Windows key is 100% legal in a lot of countries. The USA... doesn't exactly have the best consumer protection laws. Giant corporations are pretty much always favored over individual consumer rights.
 
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Kezarus

Member
@TsukaYuriko, love your reply. I read it all and now I got some infos to ponder about. But, most important to me, is that I can in fact reinstall GM 1.4. Thanks!

Why not? In all honesty, even if you weren't getting a new PC, you should ALWAYS be prepared in case you ever have to do a fresh install. Your data should always be backed up. SSDs don't last forever, and a bad piece of luck can easily shoot you in the foot. Some people even re-install Windows on a set schedule(like yearly) to keep things going as fast as possible.

Is there any other reason you aren't interested in a pre-built machine? I wouldn't be surprised if you can get a much better machine for the price of these components you are buying.

Finally, if it is just data you are worried about, you can always just backup the data somewhere else, or if the drive is SATA SSD it is very easy to attach it to the new machine to get the data.
No, data and backup are just fine and offsite on a cloud. The programs are my main concern.

Gonna check the pre-built section prices, but I'm pretty sure that if I put my old (but good) SSD there I will void the warranty.


I second everything GMWolf said above on Intel vs. AMD on power consumption/heat.
That was something that I wasn't aware about. Nice!


Thanks for all the help! =D
 

kburkhart84

Firehammer Games
Gonna check the pre-built section prices, but I'm pretty sure that if I put my old (but good) SSD there I will void the warranty.
I'm not 100% sure on that, likely depends on the vendor. They can't expect you to never open the case for maintenance realistically. I know I had to activate the warranty on a machine I had bought from Microcenter(a powerSpec brand). I had added a second GTX980 to it so the case had been opened and system modified, but a couple RAM sticks went bad. They replaced them. I didn't even have to try to hide the fact that I modified the system. There may be other vendors that aren't as good in that. An alternative is to use an external USB bridge to access the data. Those come in handy so it wouldn't be a bad investment. You can get one here in the US for $20 to $40, don't know about prices on those in Brazil.

As far as programs...you should have installers for those backed up too realistically. You are probably fine with bigger companies like Steam, Yoyo, and the like as their software isn't going anywhere anytime soon, but if you own something from some smaller company that could disappear anytime soon, you should always keep a backup of the latest installers.
 

Yal

🐧 *penguin noises*
GMC Elder
Also side note since nobody mentioned it, copy your Username/AppData folder to an external disk and paste it into your new computer later (it's hidden by default so turn on "show hidden files"), that's where all your program settings (e.g. browser bookmarks, savefiles for games without Steam cloud) are stored. Both when copying it and pasting it, it's safe to ignore files that need admin rights to copypaste (that's system files you don't want copypasted over wholesale). Saves you a lot of setup work.
 

Kezarus

Member
Just made a new configuration! Check it out. =]

Thanks for the pcpartpicker's link, @nacho_chicken, it help me a ton!

Parts list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/47sFMv

CPU: Processador Intel Core i7-10700F, Cache 16MB, 2.9GHz (4.8GHz Max Turbo), LGA 1200 - BX8070110700F
COOLER: Cooler para Processador Cooler Master AMD/ Intel Hyper H412R - RR-H412-20PK-R2
MOTHERBOARD: Placa-mãe Asus PRIME B460-PLUS, Intel LGA 1200, ATX, DDR4 - 90MB13J0-M0EAY0
MEMORY: 2x Memória Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB 3000Mhz DDR4 CL16 Black - CMK16GX4M1D3000C16
HD: HD WD Blue, 1TB, 3.5´, SATA - WD10EZEX
...and my old one! =]
VIDEO CARD: Placa de Vídeo MSI NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 D6 VENTUS XS OCV1, 4GB, GDDR6
POWER SOURCE: Fonte EVGA 600W, 80 Plus Bronze - 100-BR-0600-K
CASE: Gabinete Sharkoon TG5 Blue Vidro Temperado 4mm Led Fan 12cm ATX



Remarks:
  • Video Card: I think I cannot make it any better than GeForce GTX 1650, the 1660 is double the price
  • Memory and MB: I think they are compatible
  • Power Supply: the estimated wattage was 279W, so I grabbed a 600W, double the estimated as @TsukaYuriko recommended

Is it good now? =]
 
Just made a new configuration! Check it out. =]

Thanks for the pcpartpicker's link, @nacho_chicken, it help me a ton!

Parts list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/47sFMv

Remarks:
  • Video Card: I think I cannot make it any better than GeForce GTX 1650, the 1660 is double the price
  • Memory and MB: I think they are compatible
  • Power Supply: the estimated wattage was 279W, so I grabbed a 600W, double the estimated as @TsukaYuriko recommended
Is it good now? =]
Just a note, the 1650 is barely any more powerful than the 1050ti. If there's a big price difference between the 1050ti and the 1650, you're honestly better served going with the ti and saving up for a GPU upgrade later when the market calms down. How much are AMD's older Radeon cards where you live? Namely the RX 570/580. Here, the RX 580 offers around 25% more performance than a 1650 and almost double the performance of a 1050ti at a similar price point to the 1650.

Everything else looks good.
 

kburkhart84

Firehammer Games
It seems OK to me...I just wonder if you couldn't find something better in pre-built.

This one has basically the same processor, but has the better GPU, double the size of the included SSD, but it sacrifices a little of the RAM speed. It costs a little less than your parts, and includes Windows 10 Pro, and it is already built.

I'm sure with more time spent searching you could possibly find something even better, depending on the actual budget you've decided on.
 

Kezarus

Member
Namely the RX 570/580
Hmmm, here we just have the 570 from ASRock... don't know if it's any good. But the reviews are not as sharp as MSI.


This one has basically
I went to Dell to see their prices here. Link. Ouch... R$ 10k ??? O_O My build is R$ 7.5k. In Brazil we have some ludicrous prices and taxes. The site I use to buy have pretty low prices. The big corps charge A LOT, but IDK why...


Ow, had to downgrade the memory to a 2666MHz as the MB doesn't suport the other.

Final build: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/Xt2Mgt


Thanks everyone! =]
 

Kezarus

Member
Ow, by the way! I bought my setup! I compared AMD vs Intel and had to change eeeeverything again. It's the best machine I could buy here.



Last build:
  • Link: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/fgCqy4
  • Processador AMD Ryzen 7 5800X 3.8GHz (4.7GHz Turbo), 8-Cores 16-Threads, AM4, Sem Cooler
  • Cooler para Processador DeepCool Frostwin LED Blue 92mm Intel-AMD
  • Placa Mãe Gigabyte A520M S2H, Chipset A520, AMD AM4, mATX, DDR4
  • Memória DDR4 OLOy Owl Black, 16GB, 3000MHZ, MD4U163016CJSA (x2)
  • Placa de Vídeo ASUS Phoenix GeForce GTX 1650 OC, 4GB GDDR6, 128bit
  • HD Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB, Sata III, 7200RPM, 64MB
  • Fonte Cooler Master MWE V2 650W, 80 Plus Gold, PFC Ativo
  • Gabinete Gamer Thermaltake Versa J25 RGB, Mid Tower, Vidro Temperado, Black, Sem Fonte, Com 4 Fans, CA-1L8-00M1WN-01

Thanks a lot for everyone's help! =D
 
Ow, by the way! I bought my setup! I compared AMD vs Intel and had to change eeeeverything again. It's the best machine I could buy here.



Last build:
  • Link: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/fgCqy4
  • Processador AMD Ryzen 7 5800X 3.8GHz (4.7GHz Turbo), 8-Cores 16-Threads, AM4, Sem Cooler
  • Cooler para Processador DeepCool Frostwin LED Blue 92mm Intel-AMD
  • Placa Mãe Gigabyte A520M S2H, Chipset A520, AMD AM4, mATX, DDR4
  • Memória DDR4 OLOy Owl Black, 16GB, 3000MHZ, MD4U163016CJSA (x2)
  • Placa de Vídeo ASUS Phoenix GeForce GTX 1650 OC, 4GB GDDR6, 128bit
  • HD Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB, Sata III, 7200RPM, 64MB
  • Fonte Cooler Master MWE V2 650W, 80 Plus Gold, PFC Ativo
  • Gabinete Gamer Thermaltake Versa J25 RGB, Mid Tower, Vidro Temperado, Black, Sem Fonte, Com 4 Fans, CA-1L8-00M1WN-01

Thanks a lot for everyone's help! =D
Looks good! A couple of notes: the potential incompatibilities at the bottom are important to look into.
1614984304747.png
The big red warning is because some older motherboards won't support the latest CPUs without a BIOS (firmware) update. You usually can't do this without a compatible (older) CPU. The site can't automatically check every single motherboard, so you'd need to check if your specific board supports Ryzen 5xxx series CPUs out of the box. With some preliminary searches, looks like it does!

The second note is because your CPU cooler doesn't come out of the box with the necessary equipment to attach it to your motherboard. You would need to buy a separate adapter. This will add about 10-15 USD to the cost of your cooler, so you may want to change your cooler if this sounds like a bit too much.

The third one, it's bit hard to tell what RAM is compatible with which coolers. Some RAM sticks are stupid tall and others are very short. Coolers know that sizes vary and compensate in their design, but some compensate better than others. Best thing to do would be to look up PC builds using your CPU cooler and see what kind of RAM they use. If they're all using low-profile RAM, you may have a problem and need to change either your RAM or cooler.
 

Kezarus

Member
Thanks again @nacho_chicken. Yeah, the store that I bought the machine will assembly everything.

About the first issue... Yikes! I hope that they can make it at the workshop, if the MB doesn't work right out of the box. I think it's compatible by what I saw on their site at the time.

The second, hmmm, they are selling this as part of an assembly that they are doing. I hope that they call me if something is missing.

Third, in this case, my ram is pretty slim! =]


Cheers! =D
 

Kezarus

Member
Yeah... GPU are so absurdly expensive right now.

I have to buy a new PC 'cause my current machine is about to die and I use it 16h a day, but this is the worst moment possible.

Corona is hitting my country very hard and the goverment is making everything else impossible.

I don't even know what to say. I'm considering moving from here for good. 😐
 
Thanks again @nacho_chicken. Yeah, the store that I bought the machine will assembly everything.

About the first issue... Yikes! I hope that they can make it at the workshop, if the MB doesn't work right out of the box. I think it's compatible by what I saw on their site at the time.

The second, hmmm, they are selling this as part of an assembly that they are doing. I hope that they call me if something is missing.

Third, in this case, my ram is pretty slim! =]


Cheers! =D
Oh, great! You don't need to worry about that at all. If you're going to a shop that will assemble it for you, they'll take care of updating the motherboard if it needs that, as well as any other problems. If they're taking care of putting the parts together as well, then you have very little to worry about with compatibility.
 
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