Design Concessions for motion/simulation sickness

Discussion in 'Game Design, Development And Publishing' started by Karasu_Tomoe, Dec 20, 2018.

  1. Karasu_Tomoe

    Karasu_Tomoe Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2018
    Posts:
    19
    I'm working on a game with mechanics akin to the PunchOut series. For technical reasons I chose to use a 3D first-person perspective. However, as I playtest and move and dance around in the game, I start to get disoriented and nauseous, which NEVER happens to me.

    So I figured I'd better start looking into this simulation sickness phenomenon and how I can design my game to reduce its impact. However, a lot of sources for research have mixed or vague recommendations. Example: some sources say a wider FOV helps with the sickness, while other sources recommend a more narrowed and focused FOV. One source says that to avoid a lot of movement acceleration (constant speeds), while others say to make it as fluid and life-like a possible.

    So I'm at a crossroads here. Whatever overhauls I make to my game to accommodate this, I worry about them actually making it worse.
     
  2. flyingsaucerinvasion

    flyingsaucerinvasion Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2016
    Posts:
    2,034
    Logically, in order for the image not to be distorted, the field of view in game should be equal to the proportion of the player's view the monitor occupies in real life. Perhaps a good place to start would be by measuring how far from your monitor you're sitting, the height of your monitor.

    Have you tried increasing the frame rate?
     
  3. The-any-Key

    The-any-Key Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2017
    Posts:
    1,516
    Make sure you don't have a mounted camera on a stick behind the player that reacts instantly on every player movement. Pretend there is a real cameraguy that follow the player instead and adjust the camera movement accordingly what a real cameraman can do. Even if he got flying capabilities :) This often remove some motion sickness.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2018

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