OFFICIAL Announcing The Opera GX Game Jam

Appsurd

Member
Thanks for the judging so far! It must be really though to select the best games out of so many entries!
And understandably some games will not 100% comply to the restrictions, but perhaps can be adjusted easily.
Anyway, congrats to the top-100 so far!
 

Micah_DS

Member
People are going to be angry about your top 100, specially considering that some of the entrys dont follow the requiriments for the jam, would have been a lot better to just give the top 4 and let the rest of the developers believe that they could have been close to the top 4... now you have 800+ that are dissapointed to not even making it to the top 100... and you have some of those 100 developers getting their games attacked because they got selected in this group without even meeting the jam's rules...
I can't speak for everyone, but I'm one of those 800, and I'm not mad at all. It's hard to be mad when so many people did so incredible, and I'm not saying that just to be nice or something - many of the entries honestly did blow me away when I saw them. And from doing voting on other jams myself, I know how impossible it can be to rank games in order of greatness, and that's with 100 games or less. I can't imagine what it's like trying to sort through 900 games. So I expect the judges are doing their best. I can't ask for or expect more.

Even though I didn't make the cut at all, I'm still happy to have joined this, because my post-jam version ended up being one of the most fun games I have ever made, and it was a great opportunity to learn and grow my various game development skills.
 

Chaser

Member
@makas people shouldn’t be angry really, but I get that some will be emotional after putting a lot of effort into their projects for this jam. It’s an emotional roller coaster, and we are all pretty tired from all the work we put in, and at the same time excited at what we could achieve should are games do well. It’s always nice to place somewhere in a jam, it’s even nice to finish winning a jam, but when we don’t it can be a bit demoralising and in some cases make people angry unfortunately. When we don’t do well, or not as good as we think we should it’s only natural to seek the reasons why, so we can improve and learn from it, which is really what a game jam is all about. I think in this case because there were cash prizes, and a significant reward, it moved the goal posts from jam expectations, to a competition. With that brings a whole new set of emotions and expectations.

The ‘favourite 100’ that was posted I believe was something meant in good faith, and to keep the excitement around the jam. We need to remember it’s ‘favourite’ not ‘contenders’. The top 4 may or may not be this 100. So just because a project may not be in this, doesn’t mean that the judges have made their mind up yet, they could have another top 10 or some other short list, we just don’t know. However, what this ‘favourite 100’ did was give recognition to those in it, and left 800 participants out, and I think for some this left a bad taste in the mouth and disappointed. Like any competition, or anything that involves some sort of ranking/judging there are going to be winners and losers, and when there is a lot of hard work involved we are are always going to be seeking the reasons why we may of failed, so we can improve and learn and do better next time. It’s natural. But with so many projects, and time constraints it would be an impossible job to get those answers, so we will go looking for them to justify what we are feeling. In this case, the rules are going to be at the forefront of this and are going to be picked apart.
There is a lot of, “this game doesn’t have this, or that” so it shouldn’t be here/there, “it doesn’t follow the rules” and because our project does, we will automatically feel ‘cheated’ and feel that this is unfair. There’s seems to be some sort of misunderstanding, or misinterpretation of the rules, but if we look at the rules there is only ONE hard rule.

“The game MUST incorporate the mystery theme”

The other rules are “Should”.
So ideally every project would be working towards all the ‘should’ goals. However some/most might not get all of them in for whatever reasons, bug fixing, polishing etc. Some may get them all in, which is great, but some may only get 3/7 or so on. What this demonstrates is that judges are willing to consider ALL projects and not dismiss all those that didn’t. It’s a very flexible and leanient approach to the projects, and gives EVERYONE a chance from different learning curves and development experiences, from novice, hobbies to professional. Otherwise the pros would win or have a higher probability for a winning because their experience would set them apart from the rest.It’s not so much about who can hit every target on the button, but at what POTENTIAL can come from the projects. Let’s not forget that the YoYo staff would be hands on to the winning project too if needed, so anything can be worked on then too, this is going to play apart towards the winning project. And in the end, if they like something about a project, and it’s missing some elements, then they will work to add it to fufill what Opera want for their browser. Because remember this is about Opera, not so much YoYo, so let’s not bash each other’s projects, anyone at YoYo, or anyone for that matter because we feel hard done by. We all worked very hard on our projects,and I mirror what @Micah_DS says.

Also I would like to add, that we made some tremendous efforts on our projects, but we should spare a thought for those that are judging and that are playing our games. as someone who rates games a lot, to go through 900+ is a massive under taking, and to judge them and to pick a short list of 4 is an even tougher job. :)
 
I'd like to point out that the gamejolt pages are broken and if you look at the top 3 games in the collection and then go to the next page, it still shows those same top 3, but with a couple extra titles at the bottom. If you go to the last page (so as many entries are showing as possible), you'll see that there are still only 60 games showing.

It's possible that if you cannot find your game, it is in this hidden 40!

Also, if you give the collection a follow, you'll receive notifications on changes to it. The judging deadline hasn't passed yet so there may be final changes made!
 
As an aside, I think the people that picked out specific projects to dump on were acting quite childishly and viciously without any thought towards the developers of said projects (most of the comments have been deleted already). General "I think that some projects didn't meet the criteria" comments are fine (if a bit forced, considering the ways these projects didn't meet criteria are up for interpretation), but linking to specific projects is kinda gross. Thankfully, I haven't seen any of the members of the GMC participating, to my knowledge, so good job folks!

On a less stupid note: Congrats to everyone who were marked as the top 100 favourites from Yoyo, and congrats to everyone else too! The quality of the games was pretty incredible and I'm sure everyone worked themselves to the bone trying to do what got done in the limited time we all had! There are so many great submissions, both in and out of the top 100, it's kinda mind-blowing...Everyone really stepped up. There are quite a few projects I saw that could probably be turned into commercial games with a bit more work which is really cool. So great job on all the hard work from everyone!
 
As an aside, I think the people that picked out specific projects to dump on were acting quite childishly and viciously without any thought towards the developers of said projects (most of the comments have been deleted already). General "I think that some projects didn't meet the criteria" comments are fine (if a bit forced, considering the ways these projects didn't meet criteria are up for interpretation), but linking to specific projects is kinda gross. Thankfully, I haven't seen any of the members of the GMC participating, to my knowledge, so good job folks!
I might be in the minority here, but it's really disingenuous to delete these negative comments; (unless they were personally abusive, obviously, so let's assume we're not talking about those ones.)

People in the game dev community are in generally fairly polite, encouraging, etc, and don't really give their real thoughts as feedback.. so these types of topics are quite rare opportunities to get very real, and very pointed feedback on a game. Some feedback might sting a little bit, but that's balanced out by being selected to be top 100 by a panel of expert judges, so no harm, no foul.
 
I don't think these people are giving their real thoughts, I think they were just dumping on projects because they are salty. For instance, the most linked "bad" game was very simple, but it was surprisingly fun. It lacked depth, but I absolutely do not think it was worthy of being held up as a shining beacon of "bad" and I spent more than a few minutes playing it and enjoying it myself. A lot of the comments were "Flappy Birds is bad" style comments. Not really critiques, just developers being salty that a game they consider simpler and "beneath" them got popular.
 
Oh, I don't know. Let's run with this as an exercise, see if we get anywhere useful.

I'm not under any illusion that anyone is giving a good breakdown.. as a dumb example, let's look at: 'this game sux, looks like flappy birds' as feedback, and it can be useful feedback;
- Someone played your game (check!)
- Someone didn't like your game (useful.. even if negative. What type of player were they? they like FPS? oh... prob that's an audience your game isn't hitting!)
- Someone might have given feedback on why they didn't like your game. (flappy bird sux, this is clone blah blah); Again; Player, demographic, what and why.

If nothing; let the developer question the design, look at it from another angle. why was the game bad for that player?. Dev's feed off positive reinforcement, but it can be dangerous. You get in a loop where you're not looking at what's wrong with a game, what's unbalanced, and you end up with something broken.

Dev's often go back to their old projects from years ago, and find that often there's some (often glaringly) majorly broken game mechanic. No one complained about it, or gave and indication that there was a problem with the game.. and the dev was blind, because they were far too close to the weeds. Not enough negative feedback, not enough questioning the design perhaps

Or maybe they're game never took off, and they never figured out why, and then revisiting it they see it's a bubble popper for grannies, and they only advertised it to their hard-core gaming buddies. Never thought about who their game is really for.
 
I just think there's a difference between honest feedback motivated by simply playing the game (which most people got from the general comments, I definitely had a more than a few people comment with legitimate criticism) and feedback that is motivated by the fact that the feedbackees X made it into the favourites while the feedbackers Y did not. In a sense, there's a conflict of interest when it comes to the "criticism" that was given. Combine that with the low quality of the feedback, and I don't think it was helpful or necessary. I really don't think we need to tangle this into proverbial thought exercises for us as a community to say "Hey, maybe ****ting on a game that made it into the favourites isn't the best move, in terms of professionalism," regardless of how the individual/s being targeted should take the feedback.

Game jams are meant to be fun, relatively consequence-free ways of stretching your dev wings. Plenty of people who participate are new to game dev and might need a little encouragement. I can tell you that if my early game jam attempts got singled out as examples of **** games, I might not be here now. Extreme time constraints, personal life and technical skills all play a more exaggerated role in game jams compared to normal dev, and I think it's a bit crazy to be like "Hey, why don't we let people **** on the individuals entering?" There are already plenty of places you can go to get **** on relentlessly as a game dev, such as, say, any of the big publishing platforms.
 

Khao

Member
if we look at the rules there is only ONE hard rule.

“The game MUST incorporate the mystery theme”
Even then, what makes the complaints even weirder is that I always saw game jam themes as something to be interpreted. The theme is UFO. Does that mean that you HAVE to absolutely under all circumstances only have a stereotypical UFO doing stereotypical UFO things and if you want to deviate from that interpretation you're breaking the rules?

Hell no. The theme in a jam should encourage creativity. Not limit it. If you're inspired by the theme to create something unexpected that the judges ended up appreciating... That's a good thing. The word UFO immediately makes a lot of people fantasize about space, which can mean such a wide variety of things to different people.

I honestly don't get it. There's billions of different ways to interpret a jam's theme. That's the point of having a theme in the first place. I can't say that people were doing it wrong just because they imagined something I could not.
 

Chaser

Member
" themes as something to be interpreted "
exactly this. it's up to the dev/s how they want to 'interpret' the theme, and put there own spin on it. Some games just used the abbreviation and come up with something completely different to what would be expected when it comes to U.F.O. The Opera U.F.O no internet screen has a U.F.O, the game jam banner had a U.F.O, so it wouldn't be uncommon for an expectation for the U.F.O theme to actually be or include U.F.O's. But it didn't have to, doesn't mean it broke any rules in my opinion. :)
 
Interpretations of the theme aside, they did post a technical guide with some rules that were supposed to be followed. I'm guessing the top 100 games might all be games that impressed the judges, but that doesn't necessarily mean they all meet the criteria to win the contest.
 

Chaser

Member
Its a 'Technical Guide' though, it's not a requirement, nor was it mandatory, it's there to help/assist those that may need it. it is a GUIDE only, there was nothing that said you MUST adhere to this. Again it's all misunderstood information.
 

FoxyOfJungle

Kazan Games
I think some didn't read it, but there was a much larger document on the home page that you should accept. It has all the rules, in a very specific way. Also, if someone wins and has not accepted them, I believe they will not receive the prize (according to what is written there).



 

Chaser

Member
@drandula Click the 'Document' link in foxy's post and it will take you straight there, so you can fill it in. :) i don't remember getting any email confirmations.
 

makas

Member
I would never direct call anyones game in the way a lot of people did in the gamejolt forum, that is disrespectful and just mean, but I understand why some people would get mad ... we followed all the rules as much as we could, because for us was clear that they were looking for a very specific kind of game something in a way similar of what the dinousar game does for google chrome. so you enter the jam following the rules the best you can do it, you expend 2 weeks working hard to make an interesting game within the boundaries of the rules and at the end the only thing you have is that you are out of the top 100 from 908 entries with some of those games no even following all the rules, dissapointment is normal I think... we will work in our game to have a mobile version soon so of course we are trying to get the best of this, but I still think that showing the top 100 is just a little mean for most of the developers that participated, right now 808 developers are sure they wont win, 808 developers could think that their game could be very well the last game on the judges list.... if you only show your top 4 (and please be games that follow the rules) I think that most of the developers that right now are a little salty and mad wouldnt be that much...

I know it was a with good intention but for me clearly backfired and I understand why, in the last gamejam at least we have a lot of more feedback, from the developers and with the system that itch have, I understand that itch is also flawed because is subjetive to vote manipulation, but as far as I saw, the games that were artificially voted were banned and thats a big positive for that system, because at the end I could see more clearly what my game was missing, what could I have done better and how well the theme was used... right now the only think that I have is a feeling of dissapointment and almost 0 feedback.

Anyway I am sure that the final top 4 will be pretty amazing games that follow the rules and all this will colddown, good luck to everyone that still have a chance to win and congrats to anyone winning, is a big opportunity for any developer, not only because of the money but because the game will be played by millions of users and I know that is the dream of most indie developers, I am sure is mine, I will keep trying to make it, but I will probably think twice to enter the next oficial gamejam if there is another one in the future, the feeling right now for me yeah is a bit salty, a bit sad, and a bit angry... nothing like other gamejams that I have participated, specially the ones that this community does, the system that are implemented in the GMC gamejam are superb and everyone gets an amazing feeling after participating here even if you are the last in the list, you got a lot of feedback and good vibes from everyone and thats how developers should feel after a game jam... anyway good luck to opera and yoyogames I love this tool and I hope the better for it, cheers.
 
because for us was clear that they were looking for a very specific kind of game something in a way similar of what the dinousar game does for google chrome.
To be completely honest, I've done a bunch of jams and nothing in these particular rules stood out to me as saying that the game had to be done in that style. Obstacles can mean anything really, and yeah, they gave an example of literal obstacle dodging, but that doesn't mean that's the only interpretation. Part of the fun of jams is finding creative ways to interpret the rules to make your game stand out. I kinda get the feeling that my game was one of the games considered "not following the rules" as it's a pretty alternative interpretation of the theme compared to most of the games created. If I were to get disqualified for not following the "rules" exactly, then eh, I took a risk, I had a particular vision and it didn't pay off.

Usually, jams that require a very specific style of game have that plastered all over the place (i.e. "The Top Down Shooter Jam" or whatever). There were multiple places the rules were posted and only one mention of an example of what an endless game could be using obstacles. The only actual thing in the rules, as has already been pointed out, was "endless". I haven't played a game yet that isn't "endless" (although, I definitely haven't played them all). I mean, it sucks if it feels like you misinterpreted it, but that isn't really the problem of the other games...
 

Chaser

Member
The level of entrys for this jam compared to the GMC jam is quite a substantial difference, and the GMC is community driven. This wasn't, it was 'corporately' driven with cash prizes, so the playing field was always going to be different. In the end we all just have to accept that some else's project did better than ours, for whatever reason the judges deem or agree on, and having the judges is by far the most fairest way to judge your projects than an automated system, which as you say, can be manipulated. You may feel this was a negative experience, but i'm sure there are many positives to take from this experience once the 'saltyness' calms down and you take a moment to reflect. My game didn't get in the top 100 either, but you know what, it doesn't matter. i made something, and i think its pretty cool. yeah it has many flaws, but one day il fix it up and it will be great. i'm sure yours can be to. Getting feedback for your project wont be to hard. You only have to ask the community here and i'm sure some will respond honestly and kindly. I'l give you some feedback if you like, i may have already played your game. i can't tell you why your project didn't get in the top 100, but i can give you my opinion or 'constructive critisism' for what its worth, if you think it will help push your project forward. :)
 

makas

Member
@Chaser You seem like a really nice guy and very positive person , I would like to be as positive as you, of course I am no that negative either as I said I am already working in the Mobile versión of our Game, we are proud of what we did, and we really liked the final product, the frustration comes from the feeling that from all the jams we have participated for us this Game was the most polish and close to an actual final product with cool graphics and decent gameplay, we were 21th in the last Game jam, we had lots of feedback and very Nice comments about our last Game, in this one we got almost nothing so the feeling in this one is totally different... Anyway I will just shake that feeling up and keep programing, cheers!
 
Ok, I also need/want to say something about this issue with the jam:

I hope I win the 10.000 $. I'm a father of two and I'm absolutely not above selling out or rather knowing the value of money. This sum is absolutely life-changing.

That being said, please don't do game jams with money prizes anymore. It is not good for the community. And it's also not good for the company.
A vocal minority will always release its anger/disappointment not winning and everyone else is left with a bad taste in his or her mouth. It already happened before at the end of the otherwise phenomenal neon jam. Many will be happy and many will be indifferent but some will be loud and upset and I don't think there's anything one can do about people complaining on the internet.

I really like the two weeks format [everything shorter wouldn't allow me to participate at all] and being able to still talk to other participants is the best part of it. The neon jam feedback weeks were great and the fireside chat at the beginning of this jam was my highlight for this one. Usually, longer jams do not have such a big community behind them [or at least the ones I know of] but here that's not the case. Maybe this could really become a regular thing for a different target audience. Maybe instead of money winnings, the top three could win game maker licenses for a year or something. Yoyo wants to push the people who can showcase their engine in the best light possible and that would be a really cool way to do it. I don't know. I just think maybe then, people wouldn't be so upset about not placing high enough.
 

gnysek

Member
some else's project did better than ours, for whatever reason the judges deem or agree on
Yeah, I never played Minecraft cause this games looks boring and unattractive for me, but some would give it 10/10 - if I would be judge in some contest, this game would be last on my list. This wasn't a contest about which game got best code, or which one got best graphics, this was about "what Opera would like to see in their browser as <<no internet>> page". Because of that, some best games might be too complex to fit into that requirement, and that's why they didn't entered top 100. It's not "top 100 best games in jam", it's "top 100 games that are great enough and simple enough to be displayed in offline mode in Browser, to people around world".

Remember, you were competing against this...
1631051924036.png

😂
 

drandula

Member
Congrats for the top 8! :D
I just played the games, and then pressed "submit vote" thinking it would be lead to voting page. Nope, it submitted whatever I had accidently chosen 😅
Also I noticed that you can go incognito-mode and vote again? I guess you have that cared about, but I'll say it aloud.
 

FoxyOfJungle

Kazan Games
Congrats for the top 8! :D
I just played the games, and then pressed "submit vote" thinking it would be lead to voting page. Nope, it submitted whatever I had accidently chosen 😅
Also I noticed that you can go incognito-mode and vote again? I guess you have that cared about, but I'll say it aloud.
The same thing happened to me! And I was going to say the same thing, you can vote numerous times if you close and open the anonymous page.

However, congrats to everyone!
 

Khao

Member
My game's among the finalists. I'm honestly still in shock. Worked on it with 3 other people. I'm seriously so freaking proud of what we created, but at the same time I never expected to make it this far in a million years, hahaha.

Even if our game doesn't win, this feels like such a massive accomplishment. It's kind of surreal.

(Game's M.i.C.E btw!)
 

Chaser

Member
@Khao. i played your game a couple of days ago, and looking at my rating scores it scored pretty well, would of been in my top 20 for sure. :)
Congratulations to you and your team, and i wish you and all the nominees all the best. :)
 
My game's among the finalists. I'm honestly still in shock. Worked on it with 3 other people. I'm seriously so freaking proud of what we created, but at the same time I never expected to make it this far in a million years, hahaha.

Even if our game doesn't win, this feels like such a massive accomplishment. It's kind of surreal.

(Game's M.i.C.E btw!)
Congrats! That's awesome! Wish you the best luck mate.

And congrats to the rest of the top 8.
 
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