A Simple Game - How Would You Approach It?

Toque

Member
Sorry not sure I understand what your asking?

Should I make a simple game?
How to make a simple game?
Keeping a game simple without having it spiral into a bigger game?

Compensation?

I’m guessing a non game dev idea of “simple” is probably a big project.

I would want a written design document before starting so there’s no confusion.
 

Kyon

Member
It's kinda like a gamejam right? Just set a timelimit for yourself. Like, a day. And plan what you could make in a day.
It'll probably be just a prototype or something.

If you're looking for examples maybe play some of the last weeks GM48 jam games; https://gm48.net/
 
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TinyGamesLab

Guest
I usually focus on the game mechanic I want to implement and plan in my head how to achieve the main characteristics (how it the data structure? does it need a ds_grid or ds_list? How will the difficulty increase?)
Then, later on, I implement the bare bones in about 1-2hrs.
Check out my game mechanics series, where I go over this process with a lot of different small games:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOvItwRqHG1w0bKRaSX8KAD3is3qeJBFB
 

Toque

Member
I usually focus on the game mechanic I want to implement and plan in my head how to achieve the main characteristics (how it the data structure? does it need a ds_grid or ds_list? How will the difficulty increase?)
Then, later on, I implement the bare bones in about 1-2hrs.
Check out my game mechanics series, where I go over this process with a lot of different small games:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOvItwRqHG1w0bKRaSX8KAD3is3qeJBFB

Those are great. Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks.
 

Joe Ellis

Member
I am curious to see how you guys would view and approach the task if someone asked you to "Make a quick, simple game"? :)
I would make a game with a piece of human feces, (as the main character) and make it bounce around and rotate as you move left and right, every time it hits a block it bounces and a piece of "itself" flies off, thus making it shrink, so the goal is to reach the end before you == nothing
(btw, I actually did this, i mean, not when someone asked me to do it, just out of boredom, but its of similar importance)
 
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Joe Ellis

Member
Yeah, no better knowledge is learnt from practical experience
However I'm not saying join the jam to learn, but just be very experimental and try anything out that comes to mind, it always helped me
 
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Hehe I was just generally curious to discuss how we would all approach that question with nothing to start :) I have thought about partaking in a GameJam but what holds me back a mo is that for some reason it feels intimidating :S I am very rusty since my days at University ya see :S
 
I would make a game with a piece of human feces, (as the main character) and make it bounce around and rotate as you move left and right, every time it hits a block it bounces and a piece of "itself" flies off, thus making it shrink, so the goal is to reach the end before you == nothing
(btw, I actually did this, i mean, not when someone asked me to do it, just out of boredom, but its of similar importance)
You know what @Joe Ellis? I did a similarish thing not too long ago out of boredom on my laptop XD

https://heresandytv.itch.io/loo-clicker
 

Toque

Member
Hehe I was just generally curious to discuss how we would all approach that question with nothing to start :) I have thought about partaking in a GameJam but what holds me back a mo is that for some reason it feels intimidating :S I am very rusty since my days at University ya see :S
I think making little games is a great way to learn. I probably wouldn’t do a jam until you can make a little game first. I personally wouldn’t use a jam as first step learning. But nothing bad about it either.
 
I think making little games is a great way to learn. I probably wouldn’t do a jam until you can make a little game first. I personally wouldn’t use a jam as first step learning. But nothing bad about it either.
Yeah I fully get ya there @Toque :) I think I need to get my practise in further before I do a Jam but it is a very enticing prospect! :D
 

Toque

Member
Yeah I fully get ya there @Toque :) I think I need to get my practise in further before I do a Jam but it is a very enticing prospect! :D
I was a little intimidated for a first jam. Lucky a veteran teamed up with me and it was a blast.

If you are interested in making a small mediocre game and can handle negative feedback and just want to do a jam and have fun then happy to team up for a jam.

I'm not a veteran. My coding is limited. I do my own pixel art. Its all for fun........... doesn't even matter if we submit a game or not. Call it practice.
 
I was a little intimidated for a first jam. Lucky a veteran teamed up with me and it was a blast.

If you are interested in making a small mediocre game and can handle negative feedback and just want to do a jam and have fun then happy to team up for a jam.

I'm not a veteran. My coding is limited. I do my own pixel art. Its all for fun........... doesn't even matter if we submit a game or not. Call it practice.
Why thank you pal! :) You know what? I think I may just take you up on that offer :) I have a lot of trust issues RE working with others after being screwed over back in university ya see, so this could be a good chance to expand and lesson those trust issues :) I'll DM you :)
 
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TinyGamesLab

Guest
I believe that Jam's are essential to help you strengthen your skills and get quick feedback.
All you have to do is treat all feedback as positive, even when they are not. I've learned more about game design from the times I participated in Jam's than from anything else.
Also it is a great opportunity to finish some game, even if the final entry is not finished at all. It has a beginning, a middle and an end!
I also suggest going to itch.io and looking for game jams there, as there is a plethora of jams and you could probably do a few of them before the next GMC Jam edition.
Good luck and me know the link to your game so I can make sure I try it and give you feedback!
 
I believe that Jam's are essential to help you strengthen your skills and get quick feedback.
All you have to do is treat all feedback as positive, even when they are not. I've learned more about game design from the times I participated in Jam's than from anything else.
Also it is a great opportunity to finish some game, even if the final entry is not finished at all. It has a beginning, a middle and an end!
I also suggest going to itch.io and looking for game jams there, as there is a plethora of jams and you could probably do a few of them before the next GMC Jam edition.
Good luck and me know the link to your game so I can make sure I try it and give you feedback!
I appreciate that pal! I will definitely let you know should that scenario hopefully play out! :D
 
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Taddio

Guest
And even, in the impossibly low odds, that you do actuallymanage to make the most terrible game ever, people are reviewing to help you improve, not to smash you down! This is all friendly stuff with your like-minded e-bros.
 
Pay no mind to the broken image links, but click here for an article about designing simple games. The author shares a few lessons learned from the "One Game a Week" challenge and "Flappy Jam." If you aim to "make a quick, simple game" you may some of those insights to be helpful. Think simple, design cleverly, and most importantly don't sacrifice fun. Good luck!
 
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"One Game a Month" and "One Game a Week" were sort of trendy in 2014. There was a lot of fuss about it on my Tweeter. I'm out and about right now, but I'll edit this post later if I think of any other good articles/tutorials for you. I wish you the best of luck. Take breaks! If you don't pace yourself you'll burn out, and burn out is not fun.
 
"One Game a Month" and "One Game a Week" were sort of trendy in 2014. There was a lot of fuss about it on my Tweeter. I'm out and about right now, but I'll edit this post later if I think of any other good articles/tutorials for you. I wish you the best of luck. Take breaks! If you don't pace yourself you'll burn out, and burn out is not fun.
Oh trust me, I know the hell of burn outs :( Workaholic ya see :/ ut thanks for your support pal and the articles! :D
 

Lumenflower

Yellow Dog
I'd come up with a simple unique gimmick that makes the game unique and then either pump out a bunch of levels using it or make it an endless high-score affair. For some reason I always find myself thinking back to an old video I watched (I think it was an interview or a Q&A or something) with Cactus, and in the background there was a video of him developing a little game where the player had to shoot little 'birds' and they would die in a small explosion which would persist on the screen. The player could then jump onto the explosion and use it as a platform to shoot more of the birds and get even higher. It was a simple little gimmick but you could see how a whole game could be built around it. As long as you can program your driving gimmick, everything else should fall into place enough to make 'a quick, simple game.

EDIT: I found it.
 
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